Locked in Combat-rule



  • Locked in Combat-rule.

    This rule is taken from A&A D-day, for use in Revised, Europe, Pacific or Anniversary ed.

    The D-day combat rules are a bit different from the classics. There are a limit of 8 land-units from each side allowed in each territory. Germany may defend a territory with 8 units, and US may attack this territory with 8 units. After one round of battle, all the units are locked in combat and can not move out of the territory before the enemy is killed. A houserule similare to this, without the unit limits of course, may be used in Revised or Europe as an option.

    1. Combat move as usual in A&A Revised, Europe or Pacific.

    2. Resolve combat:
      a) After one round of combat, the attacker may continue combat until one side is destroyed.
      b) After one round of combat, the attacker may retreat.
      This is the out of box rules.
      Here is the optional rule:
      c) After one round of combat, the attacker may be locked in combat. The attacking units stay in the contestet territory even if its still occupied by the enemy, but no more die rolling.

    (Remember submerged subs may be in same sea zone as enemy ships, and you may place new purchased ships in same sea zone as enemy ships, so having enemy units in same territory is not totally bedlam.)

    Combat example:
    Germany attack Ukraine with 3 inf and a tank. USSR defend with 10 infantry.
    After resolving one round of combat, Germany have one inf and one tank, USSR have 8 inf.
    Germany may choose to continue the attack, retreat, or be locked in combat.
    When locked in combat, the russians cant move before the German units are destroyed.
    Locking somebody in combat, will be like the sub stalling.

    Any ideas or input to this ?

    IL ?


  • 2018 2017 2016 '11 Moderator

    If I may give my opinion:

    If at any time the defender’s punch value exceeds the attacker’s punch value, the defender may choose to retreat or lock the attacker in combat until the attacker is destroyed or achieves a punch value higher than the defender.

    This would be great in persuading the allies not to strafe (or axis for that matter) and it would give a significantly stronger advantage to defending units in large armies (which could be interpreted as being dug-in defenders of a sort, as opposed to picket units which move in and get beat back out over time.)

    For instance:  Germany attacks Caucasus but the dice go poorly for Germany changing the balance of the battle giving Russia the advantage.  Since Russia’s punch is greater than Germany’s punch then Russia would be able to stop the Germans from retreating.

    BTW, this would not necessarily happen very often.  Attacking infantry only hit on a 1, but defenders on a 2.  That means you lose twice as much punch for each defending infantry lost than you would for attacking infantry.  So one could build that into their attack or don’t attack calculations without any really hard number crunching. (You’d only need to do a fast LL calculation and see if the units you expect to have left after round 1 is enough to initiate a retreat or not.)

    I’d say for naval/aerial engagements this should be a bit more involved.  If the defender has any aircraft and the combined punch of the defending aircraft is greater than the attacking aircraft then the attacking aircraft would be ineligible to retreat just air units (as would be the case in amphibious assaults.)  This would almost certainly have very little impact since the attacker could just go with 1.67 fighters for each defending fighter and easily maintain a balance of power there. (For instance, if Germany has 4 fighters in W. Europe, America attacks with 6 fighters which is 18 Punch USA vs 16 Punch Germany)

    For naval engagements, submarines would be able to escape as long as no destroyers or submarines are present to stop them. (This hails back to the AARe rule that submarines don’t need destroyers to attack submarines.)


    Just for those who are unaware:  Punch = total combat points.

    infantry = 1 Attack Point, 2 Defense Points
    Battleship = 4 Attack Points, 4 Defense Points

    Etc.


  • 2017 2016 2015 Organizer '14 Customizer '13 '12 '11 '10

    1. Resolve combat:
      a) After one round of combat, the attacker may continue combat until one side is destroyed.
      b) After one round of combat, the attacker may retreat.
      This is the out of box rules.
      Here is the optional rule:
      c) After one round of combat, the attacker may be locked in combat. The attacking units stay in the contested territory even if its still occupied by the enemy, but no more die rolling.

    (Remember submerged subs may be in same sea zone as enemy ships, and you may place new purchased ships in same sea zone as enemy ships, so having enemy units in same territory is not totally bedlam.)

    Combat example:
    Germany attack Ukraine with 3 inf and a tank. USSR defend with 10 infantry.
    After resolving one round of combat, Germany have one inf and one tank, USSR have 8 inf.
    Germany may choose to continue the attack, retreat, or be locked in combat.
    When locked in combat, the russians cant move before the German units are destroyed.
    Locking somebody in combat, will be like the sub stalling.

    Any ideas or input to this ?

    IL ?

    This is already in place as a concept i use for my Great War game and i tried to get it in the AARHE project, but it was declined as being to radical.

    From Great War:

    Coexisting:
    1. On land
    When withdrawing from combat, the attacker has the option of remaining in the territory and contesting it instead of withdrawing back to their territory. When contested, forts do not fix, and the value of the territory is halved (rounded up) for both economic worth and production.  Only the original owner gets the income and can produce there.

    While a territory is contested, each side may bring in reinforcements from the outside.  Units are not allowed to move out of the territory to another enemy or contested area without first moving back through a friendly territory, i.e. units with a movement of two can use one movement point to move to a rear “friendly” space and then move into another combat situation with the second movement point. Railroads do not function in a contested area.

    Either side may initiate a battle at any time later by simply declaring an attack.  In this way there may be several battles over a territory, with both sides attacking and falling back.

    2. At sea
    Fleets may coexist in a sea.  However, when a fleet attempts to move, the opposing side may make one attempt to intercept.  If the roll is a 1-2 on a D6 then the fleet will have to fight the enemy ships, forfeiting all movement. Subs do not follow this and may move freely out of the space.

    Battleships only fix if they are in, or if they move to, a port that is part of their alliance.

    The basic idea is to model ongoing campaigns and the problem of too few spaces to fight over in the German-Russo theater of war. It allows for more battles.

    Also, the AARHE proposal included a loss of 50% IPC for the original controlling player ( rounded down) and if it was a contested factory the original owner would still be able to build units. Only after it was captured by a new side does it allow full economic benefits to that player.

    So use the term ‘co-exist’



  • wow, what can I say ?


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