• Krieghund- Help!

    We just played our first few games of AAP40 a few days ago.

    If Japan attacks the Allies before the US is in the war, and the Western US goes from 10 IPCs to 50 IPCs, does the US IPC level automatically go up 40 IPCs at the time of the Japanese attack? This would mean that the extra 40IPCs would be available that turn for the US to buy stuff with.

    Or is the case just that the Western US goes to 50 IPCs, and the US then collects this extra income at the end of its next turn during the collect income phase?

    Do Allied powers not yet at war with Japan still collect the bonus income for their national objectives?

    We had a situation where there were just 4 Japanese fighters on the Caroline Islands, and no other Japanese pieces. The Americans sent in surface warships and transports to invade. Also, some US air units were sent to the sea zone to attack should some (or all) of the Japanese fighters come out to the sea zone to defend, while other US air units were sent to the island itself to participate in the invasion. As it turned out, all of the Japanese fighters stayed on the island, leaving the surrounding sea zone empty, and thus the US air units sent there (and the surface warships) had no combat to conduct.

    Seeing as how the US air units that were sent to the surrounding sea zone wound up with nothing to attack, and it was the combat movement portion, shouldn’t the defender have to declair the intention of air units on an airbase to remain on the island portion, or to defend the surrounding sea zone?

    Also, had the Japanese fighters come out into the sea zone to defend, some of the attacking US planes sent there were bombers. That would have meant that bombers would have been attacking defending fighters in a sea zone. I can see bombers attacking fighters in a land zone, as it would be like the bombers were bombing the fighters bases, but in a sea zone? (with an airbase, of course)

    Also, for the ANZAC national objective concerning the occupation of originally owned Japanese territories or islands, must this be done by ANZAC forces? Or is it like AA50, where it could be by any Allied force?

    Also, this bonus gets paid out just one time per game, and not every turn the said territory is held?


  • @kaufschtick:

    If Japan attacks the Allies before the US is in the war, and the Western US goes from 10 IPCs to 50 IPCs, does the US IPC level automatically go up 40 IPCs at the time of the Japanese attack? This would mean that the extra 40IPCs would be available that turn for the US to buy stuff with.

    Or is the case just that the Western US goes to 50 IPCs, and the US then collects this extra income at the end of its next turn during the collect income phase?

    They receive the income in the collect income phase.  Think of it as the time it takes a country to mobilize for war.
    @kaufschtick:

    Do Allied powers not yet at war with Japan still collect the bonus income for their national objectives?

    Yes.
    @kaufschtick:

    We had a situation where there were just 4 Japanese fighters on the Caroline Islands, and no other Japanese pieces. The Americans sent in surface warships and transports to invade. Also, some US air units were sent to the sea zone to attack should some (or all) of the Japanese fighters come out to the sea zone to defend, while other US air units were sent to the island itself to participate in the invasion. As it turned out, all of the Japanese fighters stayed on the island, leaving the surrounding sea zone empty, and thus the US air units sent there (and the surface warships) had no combat to conduct.

    Seeing as how the US air units that were sent to the surrounding sea zone wound up with nothing to attack, and it was the combat movement portion, shouldn’t the defender have to declair the intention of air units on an airbase to remain on the island portion, or to defend the surrounding sea zone?

    Such is the defenders perogative.  The attacker has to put his cards on the table.  Then the defender can choose to scramble (or not).  The attacker needs to plan accordingly, but in cases such as this, scramble is the only defending equivalent to the sometimes unbalancing aspect of  shore bombardment.

    @kaufschtick:

    Also, had the Japanese fighters come out into the sea zone to defend, some of the attacking US planes sent there were bombers. That would have meant that bombers would have been attacking defending fighters in a sea zone. I can see bombers attacking fighters in a land zone, as it would be like the bombers were bombing the fighters bases, but in a sea zone? (with an airbase, of course)

    It’s an abstraction,but there are some players who argue that bombers should not participate in naval combat at all as that was more a tactical bomber role, not a strategic bomber. Just the way the game works.

    @kaufschtick:

    Also, for the ANZAC national objective concerning the occupation of originally owned Japanese territories or islands, must this be done by ANZAC forces? Or is it like AA50, where it could be by any Allied force?

    Also, this bonus gets paid out just one time per game, and not every turn the said territory is held?

    Anzac only, and only once a game (it’s a moral booster).

  • Official Q&A

    @kaufschtick:

    If Japan attacks the Allies before the US is in the war, and the Western US goes from 10 IPCs to 50 IPCs, does the US IPC level automatically go up 40 IPCs at the time of the Japanese attack? This would mean that the extra 40IPCs would be available that turn for the US to buy stuff with.

    Or is the case just that the Western US goes to 50 IPCs, and the US then collects this extra income at the end of its next turn during the collect income phase?

    The US’ income goes up immediately, not its on-hand IPCs. The IPCs are only collected during the Collect Income phase of the US turn and it will be available to spend in the following turn.

    @kaufschtick:

    Do Allied powers not yet at war with Japan still collect the bonus income for their national objectives?

    Yes, unless the individual objective specifically states otherwise. For example, the US Philippines NO does not require the US to be at war, but the wartime economy NO does.

    @kaufschtick:

    We had a situation where there were just 4 Japanese fighters on the Caroline Islands, and no other Japanese pieces. The Americans sent in surface warships and transports to invade. Also, some US air units were sent to the sea zone to attack should some (or all) of the Japanese fighters come out to the sea zone to defend, while other US air units were sent to the island itself to participate in the invasion. As it turned out, all of the Japanese fighters stayed on the island, leaving the surrounding sea zone empty, and thus the US air units sent there (and the surface warships) had no combat to conduct.

    Seeing as how the US air units that were sent to the surrounding sea zone wound up with nothing to attack, and it was the combat movement portion, shouldn’t the defender have to declair the intention of air units on an airbase to remain on the island portion, or to defend the surrounding sea zone?

    Scrambling is done after combat movement is completed, so the defender may scamble air units (or not) based on the attacker’s combat movements.  This does create an interesting situation, though, in that the attacker may end up attacking nothing in the sea zone.  This probably needs to go in the FAQ.

    @kaufschtick:

    Also, had the Japanese fighters come out into the sea zone to defend, some of the attacking US planes sent there were bombers. That would have meant that bombers would have been attacking defending fighters in a sea zone. I can see bombers attacking fighters in a land zone, as it would be like the bombers were bombing the fighters bases, but in a sea zone? (with an airbase, of course)

    How is this any different than if the fighters were defending from a carrier?

    @kaufschtick:

    Also, for the ANZAC national objective concerning the occupation of originally owned Japanese territories or islands, must this be done by ANZAC forces? Or is it like AA50, where it could be by any Allied force?

    It must be ANZAC forces. However, ANZAC doesn’t have to capture the territory - it just has to occupy it. This means that it can either capture the territory itself or move units into a Japanese territory that’s already been captured by either the UK or the US.

    @kaufschtick:

    Also, this bonus gets paid out just one time per game, and not every turn the said territory is held?

    Just one time.


  • Good job Krieghund. Why didn’t you write the rulebook? Or did you?

  • Official Q&A

    It was a group effort.


  • @Krieghund:

    It was a group effort.

    Name the conspirators.


  • @Krieghund:

    @kaufschtick:

    Also, had the Japanese fighters come out into the sea zone to defend, some of the attacking US planes sent there were bombers. That would have meant that bombers would have been attacking defending fighters in a sea zone. I can see bombers attacking fighters in a land zone, as it would be like the bombers were bombing the fighters bases, but in a sea zone? (with an airbase, of course)

    How is this any different than if the fighters were defending from a carrier?

    We played it correct, and that was our final rationale on the situation. But with the lack of an actual carrier being present in the combat zone, it gave us the impression that many a B-17 & B-24s were swooping in on the defending Zeros and laying the wood to them! 😮 😄

    When bombers attack fighters that are from a carrier or in a land zone, it seems intuitive that the bombers are actually attacking the fighters base or carrier, and that is where and why the action occurs. But in this unique situation, with no carrier or base in the actual combat zone, it creats the impression that we would’ve had bombers going after fighters! 😄

    We’re good with it too, it just seems kinda funny to imagine (fade to dream sequence)… a flight of B-24 Liberators flying high cover at 20 thousand feet;  spotting a formation of Japanese Zeros below them; the Liberator formation leader calling out “drop external fuel tanks” (tanks punch off in unison); the Liberators winging over, one by one to dive down and attack the Zeros; One of the Zero pilots calls out to Saburo Sakai, “Break left Saburo! You’ve got a pair of B-24s hot on your tail!”; Saburo responds “I’ll break left in a minute, but first I’m going to eat lunch here in the cockpit…I’ll shake off the flying furniture trucks after I’m finished.” 😄 😄 😄 😄

    Thanks for the clarifications! 🙂

  • Liaison TripleA '11 '10

    Can I scramble fighters to block Naval Combat Movements?

    This would be a game changing Dynamic 🙂

  • Official Q&A

    No.  Scrambling is done after all combat moves are completed.  You can only scramble in a sea zone in which enemy units end their movement.

Suggested Topics

  • 7
  • 3
  • 3
  • 4
  • 4
  • 5
  • 4
  • 2
I Will Never Grow Up Games
Axis & Allies Boardgaming Custom Painted Miniatures
Dean's Army Guys

50
Online

16.3k
Users

38.0k
Topics

1.6m
Posts