• @TG:

    No, what i predict i made clear in previous posts

    Heh, looks like you didn’t. :-?

    Ignorance, arrogance, importing foreign top workers and becoming dependant on importing them as none will be raised from the own population…… along these lines


  • Ignorance

    explain.

    i

    mporting foreign top workers and becoming dependant on importing them as none will be raised from the own population

    explain.


  • @TG:

    Ignorance

    explain.

    I will explain by examples:
    How many percent of US citizens can point out Afghanistan and/or the Iraq on a map?
    Why are people from aborad asked questions like “do you have showers/cars/computers in xxx?”

    i

    mporting foreign top workers and becoming dependant on importing them as none will be raised from the own population

    explain.

    How many US-american born and raised people start to study math, physics, chemistry, biology, etc. … how many on the other hand study law?
    How many Post-Docs at Universities in the US come from overseas?


  • How many percent of US citizens can point out Afghanistan and/or the Iraq on a map?

    Let me give an example - out of all the US Citizens on this board, I bet that 100% can locate these two countries… :-?

    Why are people from aborad asked questions like “do you have showers/cars/computers in xxx?”

    Sure… F_alk do you have a computer/shower/car in Germany? :roll:
    Of course isn’t this as bad when people from aboard come and ask questions like, "Wow, you’re from California? You must surf and say “Dude” a lot. Ignorance? :-?

    How many US-american born and raised people start to study math, physics, chemistry, biology, etc. … how many on the other hand study law?

    Actually I know of quite many students in High School that went on to study your above subjects (quite many in biology in fact - UCSD 8)). And what’s wrong with law?

    How many Post-Docs at Universities in the US come from overseas?

    What %?


  • @TG:

    How many percent of US citizens can point out Afghanistan and/or the Iraq on a map?

    Let me give an example - out of all the US Citizens on this board, I bet that 100% can locate these two countries… :-?

    thats becuse thetr smart


  • @TG:

    How many percent of US citizens can point out Afghanistan and/or the Iraq on a map?

    Let me give an example - out of all the US Citizens on this board, I bet that 100% can locate these two countries… :-?

    A test of 3000 people each, ages from 18-24, from different countries showed:
    12.5% of the US americans in the age of 18-24 (that’s the age of the soldiers) did know where to find the Iraq. 11% could not find the US on a world map. 25% knew the order of magnitude of the population of the USA (which is: saying something from 150 - 350 millions instead of the 287 millions). About one third of the people thought in a scale of 1 to 2 billions inhabitants. 36% of the (young!) US-citizens did speak a second language (only the UK and Japan rated worse here with 35% and 19%).

    You should be able to find this in the “National Geographic”

    Why are people from aborad asked questions like “do you have showers/cars/computers in xxx?”

    Sure… F_alk do you have a computer/shower/car in Germany? :roll:
    Of course isn’t this as bad when people from aboard come and ask questions like, "Wow, you’re from California? You must surf and say “Dude” a lot. Ignorance? :-?

    Hey, this means, the questioner knows:
    (1) California is coastal
    (2) California has great waves
    (3) The stereotypical Californian is thought to be pretty relaxed.

    That is more than a questioning someone where the car/computer was invented wether they have cars or computers 🙂

    How many US-american born and raised people start to study math, physics, chemistry, biology, etc. … how many on the other hand study law?

    Actually I know of quite many students in High School that went on to study your above subjects (quite many in biology in fact - UCSD 8)). And what’s wrong with law?

    Do you know wether they plan to/will stop after a BSc, or go on to a MSc or PhD?

    How many Post-Docs at Universities in the US come from overseas?

    What %?

    Post-docs: the people who have a PhD, but are no Profs (yet)… and work in research. It’s mainly used for people working at unis and things like the NIST.


  • Although i spent considerable time working in research with post-docs, i never really got why they did that. I assumed that was until they racked up enough papers to be considered for an academic/other teaching position in a university, 'cuz i don’t think the money was that good.
    And yes - many (many) of them were Chinese. At the same time, most of the grad-students were Canadian (some of which went to Hong Kong . . . ).


  • A test of 3000 people each, ages from 18-24, from different countries showed:

    From different countries!?

    1. California is coastal

    Exactly what % of Californian land is located by the coast? “You’re from LA, whoa you must go surfing a lot!” Yeah considering it’s over an hour drive, and we’re talking of a city more western in CA…

    California has great waves

    We do? 🙂

    The stereotypical Californian is thought to be pretty relaxed

    Ha, I wish it it to be true. 🙂

    Do you know wether they plan to/will stop after a BSc and MSc.

    Depending on the subject (ex. math, physics), mostly MSc or BSs. But that’s the way it should be. You do not expect 100% of all college students go on to earn PhDs.

    Post-docs: the people who have a PhD, but are no Profs (yet)… and work in research. It’s mainly used for people working at unis and things like the NIST.

    I say quite many profs.

    And yes - many (many) of them were Chinese. At the same time, most of the grad-students were Canadian (some of which went to Hong Kong . . . ).

    Good. 😎


  • @TG:

    1. California is coastal

    Exactly what % of Californian land is located by the coast? “You’re from LA, whoa you must go surfing a lot!” Yeah considering it’s over an hour drive, and we’re talking of a city more western in CA…

    now there is a figure not even Californians know. I couldn’t even answer the simple question “what % of Manitoba boarders water bodies” or “is coastal”.
    And we have a cottage 2.5 hours away - my dad would say that he windsurfs a lot (well, less now 'cuz it just doesn’t present as much of a challenge to him.

    Do you know wether they plan to/will stop after a BSc and MSc.

    Depending on the subject (ex. math, physics), mostly MSc or BSs. But that’s the way it should be. You do not expect 100% of all college students go on to earn PhDs.

    i heard something like 5% of B.Sc.'s went to get their M.Sc., and 1% went on to their PhD’s (i.e. 20% of people with their M.Sc.'s went on to do their PhD’s) - at least i believe that’s true of Canadians.


  • i heard something like 5% of B.Sc.'s went to get their M.Sc., and 1% went on to their PhD’s (i.e. 20% of people with their M.Sc.'s went on to do their PhD’s) - at least i believe that’s true of Canadians.

    Could be.


  • @TG:

    A test of 3000 people each, ages from 18-24, from different countries showed:

    From different countries!?

    3000 each… that’s 3000 times the number of countries surveyed 🙂

    Exactly what % of Californian land is located by the coast? “You’re from LA, whoa you must go surfing a lot!” Yeah considering it’s over an hour drive, and we’re talking of a city more western in CA…

    g …well, you can …ahm… thingy… let’s say, expect too much 🙂

    Depending on the subject (ex. math, physics), mostly MSc or BSs. But that’s the way it should be. You do not expect 100% of all college students go on to earn PhDs.

    No, i don’t expect all to do it. But more than the 1% mentioned by CC.

    I say quite many profs.

    Yes, at the moment maybe. But: If you have no (or nearly no) “native” PhDs, who shall become prof once this generation retires?


  • Yes, at the moment maybe. But: If you have no (or nearly no) “native” PhDs, who shall become prof once this generation retires?

    This is a country built on immigration, I am sure those that decide to stay (on their own will), don’t revert to this instinct…

    No, i don’t expect all to do it. But more than the 1% mentioned by CC.

    I’m not sure how accurate CC’s data is (any written articles on it? :)), but I consider the act of graduating from college (and high school for that matter) to be a huge accomplishment. Judging from the rates that Americans are now attending college and finishing high school, the intelligence curve is very high compared with 50 years ago.


  • @TG:

    This is a country built on immigration, I am sure those that decide to stay (on their own will), don’t revert to this instinct…

    Yes, i agree to that. But, do you think that the US might lose their flexibility to assimilate people in the future? The Romans were great in “adopting” people (and gods and customs) from other nations, still this flexibility died away somehow later.

    I’m not sure how accurate CC’s data is (any written articles on it? :)), but I consider the act of graduating from college (and high school for that matter) to be a huge accomplishment. Judging from the rates that Americans are now attending college and finishing high school, the intelligence curve is very high compared with 50 years ago.

    I bet that is the case everywhere in the fiorst world. Parents want their children to “accomplish more than they did”, and the best way to let the children do that is giving them a higher degree.
    Do you have studies that look at the qualities of the degrees as well? From my (gut)feeling, i think that this quality is decreasing, that higher degrees are kind of inflationary.


  • @F_alk:

    @TG:

    This is a country built on immigration, I am sure those that decide to stay (on their own will), don’t revert to this instinct…

    Yes, i agree to that. But, do you think that the US might lose their flexibility to assimilate people in the future? The Romans were great in “adopting” people (and gods and customs) from other nations, still this flexibility died away somehow later.

    I think that the US is much better at “sucking that instinct away” than Canada. Many people who come here have the urge to “return home”. Even/especially 2nd generation Canadians (sorry, no data - mostly anecdotal, but thats the “Canadian salad vs. American melting pot” thing-y.

    I’m not sure how accurate CC’s data is (any written articles on it? :)), but I consider the act of graduating from college (and high school for that matter) to be a huge accomplishment. Judging from the rates that Americans are now attending college and finishing high school, the intelligence curve is very high compared with 50 years ago.

    I bet that is the case everywhere in the fiorst world. Parents want their children to “accomplish more than they did”, and the best way to let the children do that is giving them a higher degree.
    Do you have studies that look at the qualities of the degrees as well? From my (gut)feeling, i think that this quality is decreasing, that higher degrees are kind of inflationary.

    “my data” is not that accurate. Kind of a “general rule” thing. Not very accurate and i heard it from some other grad students.
    Also my dad (also a doctor) was quite philosophical about this when he was bawling me out one day for “not performing to my potential” (how many of you had that speach?) when he told me that “i’ve made something of myself. . . i’m not some immigrant farmer off the boat who’s living to see his son make something of his life, i’ve already made it. This is about you and your own success for yourself”. He’s right too and an impossible shadow to grow out of. Even yesterday i was being introduced to my preceptor by another physician who said “do you know who this young man’s illustrious father is?” He is now the “poster boy” for family medicine in Manitoba - every issue that arises on the news that might have an impact on physicians requires a minimum of one camera crew in his office (from different stations . . . ).


  • But, do you think that the US might lose their flexibility to assimilate people in the future?

    How long has it been, almost 500 years (since colonization) already? 🙂

    Canadian salad

    canadian salad? 🙂

    I bet that is the case everywhere in the fiorst world. Parents want their children to “accomplish more than they did”, and the best way to let the children do that is giving them a higher degree.
    Do you have studies that look at the qualities of the degrees as well? From my (gut)feeling, i think that this quality is decreasing, that higher degrees are kind of inflationary.

    Probably no idea, though I think completing college is already a accomplishment far ahead of the curve.


  • @TG:

    But, do you think that the US might lose their flexibility to assimilate people in the future?

    How long has it been, almost 500 years (since colonization) already? 🙂

    Well, surely the first colonists were not a mix, but all brits.
    Anotehr point that struck me on my way home (mixing threads now):
    In one thread, christianity was mentioned to be a strong “unifier and identifier”. I guess that is surely the case in the US, and one of the reasons, why christianity is such (overly) strong over there with you.
    I mean, “God’s own country” is pretty a strong phrase to pronounce the role of judeo-christian believes in the US.
    How easy is it for non-judeo-christians to “assimilate”?


  • @F_alk:

    @TG:

    But, do you think that the US might lose their flexibility to assimilate people in the future?

    How long has it been, almost 500 years (since colonization) already? 🙂

    Well, surely the first colonists were not a mix, but all brits.
    Anotehr point that struck me on my way home (mixing threads now):
    In one thread, christianity was mentioned to be a strong “unifier and identifier”. I guess that is surely the case in the US, and one of the reasons, why christianity is such (overly) strong over there with you.
    I mean, “God’s own country” is pretty a strong phrase to pronounce the role of judeo-christian believes in the US.
    How easy is it for non-judeo-christians to “assimilate”?

    the first colonists? Not all brits my friend, but the French, the Dutch, Germans. Perhaps the Mayflower was comprised of brits, but it was not long until other nationalities found a home there.
    Also in Canada we don’t assimilate very much. People gradually become Canadian but they maintain very culturally distinct indentities, and it does not seem that difficult for them to do so (just looking at the large number of Indian, Chinese, etc. practitioners of medicine anyway).


  • Well, surely the first colonists were not a mix, but all brits.

    I think CC already mentioned it. There were other races besides Brits (many Dutch, Scots/Irish, other North/Western Europeans. And also of different religions, different classes, and different ideologies.


  • I stand corrected… New York should be called New Amsterdam anyway 🙂


  • well there is always “Harlem”
    or “haarlem” as you prefer.
    Also look at Pennsylvania. You, obviously, may translate that to “the forests of Penn” - not a British name.


  • Why should the US be called “God’s own country?”

    Our religions change continually… just like every other country in the world…


  • Don’t ask me, I just live here. 🙂


  • I am familiar with the study F mentioned. It’s conclusion is that out of the major industrial nations, young Americans have a worse grasp of geography than other youngens.


  • Why should the US be called “God’s own country?”

    Where does it say that the US is God’s own country?

    Our religions change continually… just like every other country in the world…

    How so?

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