Do airfields really produce 1 victory point each turn??



  • It seems to me that if each Airfield produces 1 victory point each turn then the Japanese player will win because he or she will just buy 8 or 9 supplies and a few transports and boom you end up with 5 airfields and that would mean each player has less than 3 turns. My friend and I like a long game and i suggested that we just play to 30 victory points this would make it so we would have to ensure that we would have to keep control of our airfields and attack eachother’s airfields to pull ahead I was wondering if this work or if one side would have an advantage.


  • Official Answers

    I think you’ll find that if Japan spends enough reinforcement points to build all of those airfields that quickly that they won’t be able to hold onto them long enough to cash in on them.  It won’t have enough military strength to keep the Allies from taking some of them and knocking some of them out of commission.


  • Official Answers 2007 AAR League

    You are also assuming that the Allies won’t just take the islands before you can build on them. If one side only concentrates on building airfields it is very likely the other side will only concentrate on taking them away.



  • But you would have reinforced them by bringing all the troops from Bougainville and the most the allies could bring to are 6 units and 4 fighters if they REALLY REALLY wanted it but it would hurt their force and the axis might still even then have the island. and the axis could get 10 units if they use the one supply to have a transport go faster it seems to ma that it would break down both side’s forces.



  • I know that problem (look to http://www.axisandallies.org/forums/index.php?topic=10948.0 for a detailed description), and I don’t find a solution for the allies player until now.
    The main problem seems that the japanese player has a shorter supply route to New Georgia and need one fleet of transporter less then the us player to support that island. And the us player has not enough time to clear New Georgia completely to get control of the two airfields, as the game ends very fast.


  • Official Answers 2007 AAR League

    @Croggyl:

    The main problem seems that the japanese player has a shorter supply route to New Georgia…

    :? Ummm…. it is two moves for both sides. I think the J’s have a better position with their two moves taking them into the center of the board but neither side needs more turns to land no NG from base.



  • Frimmel, you are right! Both sides have the same distance.
    What I mean is that the japanese transport fleet at sea zone F can bridge land units from Choiseul to New Georgia without moving. The us player need two fleets which are moving between New Georgia and Guadalcanal.


  • Official Answers 2007 AAR League

    Ahhh…

    Now I understand. You guys are envisioning some sort of schuck-schuck. How is that working out in practice? I have yet to see any sort of transport chain effectively put into place.

    It appears solid but I don’t see this as some sort of sure win situation for the Axis. Is the Axis implementing this strategy to a greater preponderence of victories?



  • @frimmel:

    Ahhh…

    Now I understand. You guys are envisioning some sort of schuck-schuck. How is that working out in practice? I have yet to see any sort of transport chain effectively put into place.

    I agree with you that transportation in this one are very hard to master.  I think it all stems from the “load then move” for the sea units that carry land units.



  • @frimmel:

    It appears solid but I don’t see this as some sort of sure win situation for the Axis. Is the Axis implementing this strategy to a greater preponderence of victories?

    Whenever I’ve seen the japanese fast airfield build by myself or against me I couldn’t win with the US.

    I’ve play something around ten games (mostly against that tactic) and tried various counter:

    • brute force: try to overun New Georgia and get control over the airfields

    • strike against the main of japanese fleet at sea zone F to get additional victory points

    • second player surprise strike (air and/or fighter only) against japanese aircraft carriers at sea zone B

    • heavy submarine attack against same CVs at seazone B or against BB at sea zone F

    Defeated. All times. Sometimes I could get additional victory points to equalize the japanese victory point advantage from the airfields, but maximal for two turns. Was never enough time to overrun New Georgia.

    Perhaps not a solid analysis (too little games), but a first impression.
    Hope that helps …


  • Official Answers 2007 AAR League

    😮 All of your games have been Japanese victories?

    How much rapid deployment were each side using?

    Any idea the average number of turns per game?



  • CVs with newly build fighters are generally rapidly moved into action. The supply tokens for airfield construction mostly also moved via additional markers. After that I think the japanese move only critical transports (needed for repairing of possible damaged airfields to gain victory points). For US I tried to deploy the submarines (to get them to action at all). Can’t remember whether I move troop transports every move, sometimes yes, at least to get the tranny fleets into position.
    Sorry for that vague information, my last AAG game is more than half a year away. Mostly played AAP and AA50 since then.

    Average number of turns was five or six, I think. Correct me if I’m wrong: After first turn the japanese can have two airfield, is that right? After that two additional where build at turn two, the last at turn three. Then fifteen victory point should achieved at turn five, turn six latest.
    Game is very short with that tactic.

    Edit:
    No, not all games have been Japanese victories. 🙂
    At one or two time I tried to be aggressive with the japanese and get control of four islands. Lost two games with that.


  • Official Answers 2007 AAR League

    I think it is a good strategy but I’m just not buying that it is unbeatable.

    Maybe I haven’t been playing tough enough opponents.  😐



  • I haven’t played a game like this either, but I don’t have anyone to play with except my son, so I am effectively playing myself.  I have always played a kind of balanced game.  I agree the supply chain for Japan to New Georgia is a handicap for the allies.  It seems to me there is enough balance that this shouldn’t break the game, but I should check it out before saying much more here.  I figure there are three options for the allies.  Take New Georgia or Choiseul, Bomb airfields on New Georgia or Choiseul, Take out the main Japanese Fleet.  Of these, bombing an airfield on Choiseul or New Georgia sounds pretty attractive.  It seems the Japanese will be hard pressed to defend both.  Have all these strategies survived your playtesting?  If the Japanese are buying this many supply tokens, the US should have some benefit elsewhere.  On the other hand, assuming the US build four airfields themselves, they only have four production points more than the Japanese, which isn’t enough to buy an extra bomber.  I don’t know.  It sounds interesting.  I just can’t believe they would have missed this in the playtesting before release.


  • Official Answers

    A good rule of thumb to keep in mind is that if someone comes up with a successful “extreme” strategy, there’s usually an extreme counter-strategy for it.


  • Official Answers 2007 AAR League

    @Krieghund:

    A good rule of thumb to keep in mind is that if someone comes up with a successful “extreme” strategy, there’s usually an extreme counter-strategy for it.

    Agreed.

    The only times I recall J making strong moves on NG turn 1 I simply consolidated already on board US fleet in zone H, except for the sub which goes to zone I, moved base card ships into zone J except for one TRN to assault Malatia and sent an extra bomber to Malatia to make up for the warship land attack that I moved to Guadalcanal. Assault S. Isabel from zone H with units from GCNL and additional units to GCNL from base.

    J. has to show their hand by doing their reinforcement phase first. If J. builds the airfield on NG get some combo of a Cruiser or AC and assault forces maybe all assault forces if J hasn’t gotten reinforcements and rapid deploy to zone I.

    US moves first turn 2 and commits to assault NG from Zone I with all available units and moves units surviving at Malatia to SI for token garrison or leave SI open to lure units away from NG. Units from Malatia can be used to contest SI but J will probably have to put units into keeping NG and not taking SI. Also it is unlikely J. will have units in zone C so malatia won’t be in danger. Should be able to fight a pretty even battle on GCNL (send your sub after a cruiser in zone F if J. fleet didn’t move to zone G.)

    Even if your’re a couple dice behind FRAK IT!!! Shake the battle box and take your chances. Fortune favors the bold.

    (or don’t land, and just shell the crap out of the NG troops and figure on countering turn 3 when J has to commit first.)

    The cool thing about AAGCNL is that you can and almost have to play it a bit balls out. Remember, “Sometimes you win, sometimes you lose, sometimes it rains.”



  • A good rule of thumb to keep in mind is that if someone comes up with a successful “extreme” strategy, there’s usually an extreme counter-strategy for it.

    I copy that.
    And believe me, I felt quite uncomfortable to write one of my first posts at this group with some sort of “unbeatable strategy”. I’ve seen so many group newbies here doing that, and routinely got their posts pick to pieces … 😉

    Of these, bombing an airfield on Choiseul or New Georgia sounds pretty attractive.  It seems the Japanese will be hard pressed to defend both.  Have all these strategies survived your playtesting?

    Yes and no. Japan new units and repairing supply tokens are store temporarily at Choiseul. Japan can have one ore two aa gun at Choiseul and always can move fighters after the bombers, so that any bombing raids are hard, because with the ootb rules any hits from air combat are removed before naval/ground combat (the new rule variant with the airplane only air combat I haven’t try so far, maybe it helps).

    If the Japanese are buying this many supply tokens, the US should have some benefit elsewhere.

    Challenging, as the US player has to run with the Japanese airfield builds to hold step with victory points. Later the Japanese have many units at New Georgia which means the US pays a high price before amphibic assault while the artilley are firing at incoming ships.
    Maybe the US can build only two airfields at Guadalcanal and bring more ground units. Maybe not. Maybe it will rain … 🙂

    Understand me right: I’m not want to say that the US player has no chance. I’m not want to say that I have seen all possible moves and counters in the game. I’m not want to say that I have found an “unbeatable strategy”. But at my games it was a very, very difficult task to counter that japanese tactic.


Log in to reply
 

Suggested Topics

  • 5
  • 10
  • 6
  • 2
  • 11
  • 15
  • 2
  • 8
I Will Never Grow Up Games

33
Online

13.4k
Users

33.8k
Topics

1.3m
Posts