• 2007 AAR League

    OK. I believe that I am ready with the first 2 questions, at least. The third question will be determind by whether the first 2 are easy or hard for you guys. I have also changed the format slightly in that I will be asking 2 questions, 1 that is easier and 1 that is harder.

    Question 1: Ox-headed.

    Who was Bucephalus?

    Bonus question: How was he honored in death?


  • I had to look it up.  Had the wrong culture (albeit, a neighbor) and wrong “tale.”


  • No Clue.  Seems like Mesopotamian mythology?


  • Hmmm… the name sounds familiar… but for some reason I’m thinking it’s the name of a horse…

    The name looks Greek to me.  It just seems to flow off the tounge the same way the words Apocalypse and Parthenon would.

    I’m going to go with a Greek horse.  I’m not sure who his / her owner was.

    No idea about the bonus question.

    LT

  • 2007 AAR League

    @TG:

    No Clue.  Seems like Mesopotamian mythology?

    You’re in the neighborhood and the relevant kingdom does begin with an M.

  • 2007 AAR League

    @LT04:

    Hmmm… the name sounds familiar… but for some reason I’m thinking it’s the name of a horse…

    The name looks Greek to me.  It just seems to flow off the tounge the same way the words Apocalypse and Parthenon would.

    I’m going to go with a Greek horse.  I’m not sure who his / her owner was.

    No idea about the bonus question.

    LT

    Good call on the horse. I figured someone would recognize the name but I felt it would be too easy if I had asked “What was Bucephalus” instead of who. Besides he was treated more as a “who” by his owner, anyway.

    And you are also in the neighborhood.

    Hint for the bonus question: It was typical of Bucephalus’ owner to do this.


  • You’re in the neighborhood and the relevant kingdom does begin with an M.

    Hrm… a horse, Greek based.  And the relevant kingdom begins with an M.

    Are we talking about the Mycenae Empire?

  • '19 Moderator

    TG Moses, just when I thought I would someday reach your legendary post count.  Good to see you here again old friend, I am away in mesopotamia again, coinsidentaly it seems.

    Glad to hear your still playing, it will be a few months before I am able to give the new Aniversery addition a try myself, but I am working on a copy of revised to introduce to some of the guys here.

  • Moderator

    Go good to see ya Dezrt.

    @U-505:

    Question 1: Ox-headed.

    Who was Bucephalus?

    Bonus question: How was he honored in death?

    Alexander’s Horse.
    I’m not sure how he was honored though.


  • Alexander’s Horse.
    I’m not sure how he was honored though.

    The lightbulb just went off in my head.  If what you’re saying is correct, than Bucephalus was probably honored by Alexander naming a city after him.  I remember reading in World History that Alexander would frequently name settlements and captured cities after himself.  Besides Alexandria (the famous one), Alexander established at least a dozen more settlements based on variations of his name.  I even believe Alexander named one of those cities after his horse.

    TG Moses, just when I thought I would someday reach your legendary post count.  Good to see you here again old friend, I am away in mesopotamia again, coinsidentaly it seems.

    Good to see you too dezertfish.  If I remember correctly, you and Jensen were the first two moderators here (with Jensen being the administrator).  I did reach my legendary post count of 5000 two weeks ago.  It was something Yanny and I were both jockeying for.  I guess now, looking at someone like Imperious Leader – it really isn’t much now.  Our forum has grown up. 😉

    Axis and Allies: Anniversary is a blast.  We’ve all had a hoot playing it so far.

  • '19 Moderator

    Yanny was the first mod, I came in later, I read alot more that I posted back in the day.

    When I get back to the states I may have to go on a Axis and Allies tour, and play with guy that I’ve talked to for years… We’ll see

  • 2007 AAR League

    @DarthMaximus:

    Go good to see ya Dezrt.

    @U-505:

    Question 1: Ox-headed.

    Who was Bucephalus?

    Bonus question: How was he honored in death?

    Alexander’s Horse.
    I’m not sure how he was honored though.

    Correct.

    @TG:

    The lightbulb just went off in my head.  If what you’re saying is correct, than Bucephalus was probably honored by Alexander naming a city after him.  I remember reading in World History that Alexander would frequently name settlements and captured cities after himself.  Besides Alexandria (the famous one), Alexander established at least a dozen more settlements based on variations of his name.  I even believe Alexander named one of those cities after his horse.

    Exactly. Bucephala is believed to have been founded at or near the modern day city of Jhelum, Pakistan.

    And a bonus +1 karma to LT04 for getting halfway through the first question.

  • 2007 AAR League

    OK. This next one I think will be easier.

    Question 2:Marital bliss

    Lady Astor had had a number of exchanges between herself and a certain person. One of the most famous was her quote:

    “If you were my husband, I’d poison your tea.”

    To whom was she speaking?

    Bonus question: What was his response?


  • @U-505:

    OK. This next one I think will be easier.

    Question 2:Marital bliss

    Lady Astor had had a number of exchanges between herself and a certain person. One of the most famous was her quote:

    “If you were my husband, I’d poison your tea.”

    To whom was she speaking?

    Bonus question: What was his response?

    I believe that Sir Winston Churchill replied “and if i were your husband, i would drink it”

  • '19 Moderator

    Damn you CC, I was posting and you beat me to it.

  • 2007 AAR League

    @cystic:

    @U-505:

    OK. This next one I think will be easier.

    Question 2:Marital bliss

    Lady Astor had had a number of exchanges between herself and a certain person. One of the most famous was her quote:

    “If you were my husband, I’d poison your tea.”

    To whom was she speaking?

    Bonus question: What was his response?

    I believe that Sir Winston Churchill replied “and if i were your husband, i would drink it”

    Excellent.

    I was torn between making Churchill the answer to the question or Lady Astor and I was lulled into a false sense of security by how long it took for the first question to be answered.

    Well, as I wasn’t expecting my second question to be answered so quickly, I find myself unprepared to ask a third question so feel free anyone who wishes to try to stump the masses whilst I select one.

  • 2007 AAR League

    @dezrtfish:

    Damn you CC, I was posting and you beat me to it.

    Ah, the dreaded “beat me to it” post. That’s worth a point because I know how that feels.


  • I knew it was Winston Churchill because it was the quote at the begining of the last caspian sub paper.

    But as I don’t get to surf the net very often on the weekends I wasn’t even in the running.

    As for a mass stumping question…

    American Military History:  What year did the US Army stop using horse drawn Artilary?

    As I know this is a hard question I think search engines such as google will be alowed for this one.  just be advised that you will get a lot of dead ends.

    LT


  • I’m gonna take a guess that horse drawn arty was still prevalent in WW1, so it’s sometime after that.  Going on that, I’m going to say '39 since I’m sure not everything had transitioned to motorized units until WW2.


  • I’m going to say 1941.  I believe the Louisiana military exercises still involved horse drawn artillery.


  • @TG:

    I’m going to say 1941.  I believe the Louisiana military exercises still involved horse drawn artillery.

    That may be true so how about I revise the question. What year the the US Army stop useing horse drawn artilary for purposes other then drill and cerimony?

    This will surely give it away.

    Hint:  It was the same year as VE day and VJ day.

  • 2007 AAR League

    1945 then


  • @balungaloaf:

    1945 then

    Balungaloaf,

    You are correct, +1.  The US Army continued to use horse drawn Artillery until 1945.  Although they leaned away from sending horses over seas they were able to continue serving their country stateside by moving Artillery pieces for preparation for deployment.

    Here’s a format we have not tried before: Multiple-choice

    WWII History: What country was the last country to develop an Airborne (aka paratrooper) program?

    A) Germany
    B) Russia
    C) England
    D)    US


  • United States


  • @a44bigdog:

    United States

    You are correct +1 at ya.

    I am assuming that since the US didn’t get involved in the war until later that is the reason for the delay.

    Most countries at that point had already experimented with paratroopers by that point.  If they chose to pursue this method of delivering Infantry to the battlefield is another topic.

    U-505 would you like me to ask another or are you ready?

    LT

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