• hmm… I’ll have to look into that.

    LT

  • '17 '16 '15 Organizer '14 Customizer '13 '12 '11 '10

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k9aeg09vDZQ

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=riCTb8TsAUQ&feature=related

    remember its not a war show, but a show on the history of Korea under Japanese occupation and liberation told thru the story of class struggle and lots of suffering and strife. Alot of love stories play a large role as well.

    its on Korean Broadcasting system  KBS television at 12AM-1245AM weeknights


  • Unit 731. Thanks Jermofoot. I had forgotten the unit and I can’t remember the OIC’s name but I did watch a History Channel show about these guys. The Allies feared the possible destablization of Japan if war crimes trials were pursued in earnest. Some people like to say the Emperor was ignorant about most of the atrociteis commited by his troops. Allied leadership didn’t fall for that and knew a full set of war crimes trials would have to include the Emperor.

    We needed a stable Japan as a hedge against the expansionist plans of the commies. In retrospect it payed off. Take Korea and Viet Nam as two examples. Our bases in Japan were hugely important in both cases. Without our troops in Japan Korea would have been entirely overrun and a lot more people would have died liberating the South. Too bad we had to betray our values to help ensure our success.


  • last one is the funniest imo.


  • Last night I was watching the military channel.  They said that most of the time the towe on an air craft carrier in on the starboard (right) side of the ship.

    They said this was for a few reasons.  Most pilots are right handed so they overcompinsate to the left when they crash.  Another reason I heard was that carriers move dogged.  Meaning they don’t move stright forward they move diagonally forward.  (I find that hard to believe.)

    But all of them lead to the same result it was to avoid air units from crashing into them.

    I just thought that was interesting.

    LT


  • @Jermofoot:

    @11HP20:

    @Petrucci08:

    If i remember correctly they were also experimenting with bubonic plague as a biological weapon and nearly made an attack on san fransisco with it but disagreement from the navy prevented it.

    They did some experimenting alright. The sick pecker heads had a facility in Manchuria where they infected people then cut them open to see how the illness effected living tissue. No anesthesia just your numbers up and you get filleted alive. The victims were refered to as “logs” because their dead bodies would be stacked like firewood before incineration. Too bad the political climate after the war kept this kind of information out of the limelight.

    Unit 731 is the most notorious.  Why we held war crime trials for the Nazis but granted immunity to the Unit 731 crew for their research, I’ll never know…

    First, we held extensive war crimes trials in Tokyo following the war.  If you have a sufficiently strong stomach, I would recommend reading Knights of Bushido, which is a summary of the trials.

    With respect to Unit 731, the head was given a pass by the US because the Russians captured the facility in Manchuria where the unit was based.  We needed to know what the Russians had captured.  There is an extremely interesting document in the US National Archives that is an intelligence assessment submitted by the OSS in July of 1945, detailing the Japanese biological warfare program.  Much of the information came from the interrogation of an individual who had a degree in bacterioiogy and was assigned to the unit, but was drafted by the Japanese Army and sent as a superior private in a combat unit to Peleliu.  He was more than happy to surrender to the Marines, and sang like a little bird to his interrogators.  His information was quite accurate.  The report also includes an interesting report on German-Japanese information exchange on biological weapons, and on Japanese testing of various biological agents in China on the Chinese.  Between the contents of the assessment, and the capture by Russia of the facility in Manchuria, I with extreme reluctance agree to giving the head of the program a pass.  I really would not have wanted to be the person who had to make that decision.


  • That makes me sick. Information over justice. I can’t stand what the Japenese did to our POW’s in WWII. I understand why my grandma feels the way she does about them. (She’s suffering from alzheimer’s and dementia now) but when I was a younger I remember her visiting us in Orange County and having some anit-japenese sentiments and I didn’t understand it. She would tell me: “I can never forget what the way they treated our boys over in the Pacific”

    Now I can understand how someone would feel that way. So TIMEOVER51, will you tell me again about your mission to find that PT-109? I’m really interested in the history of that. Tell us a story! Please?….


  • I recalled a story about a Japanese Lieutenant that didn’t surrender until nearly 30 years after the formal Japanese surrender.

    Here he is: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hiroo_Onoda

    However, while I was looking for that, I found this:

    http://www.wanpela.com/holdouts/list.html


  • @Jermofoot:

    I recalled a story about a Japanese Lieutenant that didn’t surrender until nearly 30 years after the formal Japanese surrender.

    Here he is: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hiroo_Onoda

    However, while I was looking for that, I found this:

    http://www.wanpela.com/holdouts/list.html

    Wow that’s crazy.  What do you think their retro-active pay check looked like?  You know with cost of living increases, inflation…


  • @Petrucci08:

    Looks like someone’s been hanging around the making history site  😄

    Hilarious!!


  • @LT04:

    @Jermofoot:

    I recalled a story about a Japanese Lieutenant that didn’t surrender until nearly 30 years after the formal Japanese surrender.

    Here he is: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hiroo_Onoda

    However, while I was looking for that, I found this:

    http://www.wanpela.com/holdouts/list.html

    Wow that’s crazy.  What do you think their retro-active pay check looked like?  You know with cost of living increases, inflation…

    If I remember correctly, all he received was a small pension from the Japanese government, but a book was written about his holdout, which was reasonably successful.


  • Wow,thats amazing,30 years….

  • '17 '16 '15 Organizer '14 Customizer '13 '12 '11 '10

    http://www.wanpela.com/holdouts/list.html

    They even had one on Gilligan’s Island.


  • @Imperious:

    http://www.wanpela.com/holdouts/list.html

    They even had one on Gilligan’s Island.

    Yeah, but that one only lasted 3 hours.  Well, it was supposed to anyway…

Suggested Topics

  • 14
  • 8
  • 6
  • 10
  • 2
  • 1
  • 3
  • 30
I Will Never Grow Up Games
Axis & Allies Boardgaming Custom Painted Miniatures
Dean's Army Guys

37
Online

16.4k
Users

38.2k
Topics

1.6m
Posts