F4U Corsair



  • The Set 5 Checklist has this plane listed under British units.  I don’t yet possess the unit or it’s card, but isn’t that incorrect?  I was pretty sure it was an American carrier-based fighter, not a British one.



  • The set list is incorrect; it’s definately a US aircraft (and a good one too).



  • I noticed this since set V came out but didn’t care to point it out to anyone.



  • Well, I think that if ever I am to build an Allied army of only ONE nation, I will treat it as a US plane.  😉



  • Actually, The F4U Corsair went into British Carrier Service BEFORE it went into American Service. The US Navy was reluctant to certify it for carrier use, the Marines typicaly used it from land bases. But it was indeed, an American aircraft in  British service…. I found this, after I looked for a bit…  http://www.aviation-history.com/vought/f4u.html (edited for clarity)



  • The F4U Corsair was designed and built in America.  But, due to its long engine hood, pilots could not land it on a carrier (since they could not even see the deck).  The British were interested in the F4U so the Americans gave them a few.  British Navy pilots encountered the same problem, but came up with solution.  Instead of coming straight at a carrier to land like a Wildcat (as an example) does, the F4U had to come in from a 45ish degree at a carrier.  They did this by looking at the carrier deck through the downward part of the wing until the last few seconds were they had no view of the deck at all.  Once the British told the Americans about this solution, the F4U Corsair was back on US Carriers again.



  • Hey Sherman… Either you spent a heck of a lot more time around airplanes than I have, or you read the link that I posted. You’ve got it word for word. The “long hood” problem is why taildragger usually weave back & forth, on the taxiways…



  • Desertrat, when you study World War Two history as much as you can during your free time, you can learn a lot.  The only problem is remebering it all…… :|.  Also, being a hugh fan of WW2 American fighters/bombers does help.



  • So, as you & I hijack this thread, where was Americas first attempts to upgrade to jet engines, and in what manner, other than that the Bell XP-59 and Lockheeds P-80? There was a TOTALLY different project, and application, what was it?



  • Desertrat,  I have spent the past week thinking this one out, but I cannot remember what the project was called.  I do remember hearing about this, but it name/reason has slipped from my mind.



  • Northrop was developing the “Turbodyne” engine as an engine for their B-35 Flying wing bomber. The Gas turbine engine, as it was first named, was an excellent engine prospect in that it produced no vibration or rotational torque. It seems that the suction & thrust principles of the gas turbine engine weren’t appreciated, as much as its ability to provide rotational power for the XB-35s counter rotating propellers. Northrop was later ordered to divest itself from further engine development, and the rights were sold to General Electric. Hit the books! I apologize for spouting off here. I’ll keep the unsolicited history lessons to myself from now on.



  • @desertrat:

    So, as you & I hijack this thread, where was Americas first attempts to upgrade to jet engines, and in what manner, other than that the Bell XP-59 and Lockheeds P-80? There was a TOTALLY different project, and application, what was it?

    Don’t worry about that, man.  I asked my question; it was answered; and now I’m just reading the rest of this with interest.



  • Thank you AgentOrange. I was fortunate enough to be on the B-2 Bomber build team. At that time, I volunteerd to work at the Western Museum of Flight in Hawthorne California. I was also fortunate enough to meet many of aviations greatest pilots. And was one, of only two people, to speak at the Aircraft Boosters Club, (Northrops history club) more than once. Although I’m not involved in the aviation industry anymore, airplanes have been a major part of my life. Now all I’ve got to do is figure out this A&A game….



  • Yeah, speaking of learning the game, and also of aircraft, I have been playing this game since it came out.  But I didn’t even begin factoring in airplanes until I went on leave this past New Year’s, so…  😐


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