House rule this.


  • 2020 2019 2018 2017 '16 '15 '14 Customizer '13 '12 '11 '10

    @Nowhere:

    The photograph in the OP is neat in a steampunk fantasy setting, but nothing even remotely close to it existed… in fact, to my knowledge, the only serious attempt to turn a rigid dirigible into an aircraft carrier was conducted by the Americans, the USS Akron and USS Macon could carry fighters, but they latched-on underneath to underside arrestor-gear, there was no flight deck.

    Somewhat along the same lines, the USAF fooled around in the late 1940s with the concept of parasite fighters, meaning a tiny fighter plane that could be carried and launched by a long-range bomber as a form of built-in fighter defense.  The McDonnell XF-85 Goblin was such an aircraft; it was less than fifteen feet long (about the size of a subcompact car), and it was intended to be carried by the Convair B-36 bomber.  A couple of prototypes were tested, but the concept proved impractical.  The Luftwaffe experimented similarly with the Messerschmitt Me 328 during WWII.


  • 2020 2019 2018 2017 '16 '15 '14 Customizer '13

    @Nowhere:

    @SS:

    From what I read it was launched dec of 38 in Stettin but never was used. Sat there until 45 Germans sunk it. Russians raised it. Then desttoyed in 47 for target practice.

    Said it could hold 42 planes. Range 9200 miles at 21 mph could go 38
    Miles per hour top speed.
    If its the same one in pic ?

    A0 D1 M3 C12

    @SS:

    Like I said I may not have found the right info. It did say zeppelin carrier.

    Well the original photograph of a “carrier zeppelin” is a very, Very, VERY badly photoshopped dirigible that never existed… the stats you mentioned are of the traditional sea-going aircraft carrier “Graf Zeppelin”, which was a ship, not a dirigible (and at 38knots, not 38mph).

    The photograph in the OP is neat in a steampunk fantasy setting, but nothing even remotely close to it existed… in fact, to my knowledge, the only serious attempt to turn a rigid dirigible into an aircraft carrier was conducted by the Americans, the USS Akron and USS Macon could carry fighters, but they latched-on underneath to underside arrestor-gear, there was no flight deck.

    I still got 38.9 mph



  • @SS:

    I still got 38.9 mph

    My bad, the ship is 33 knots, which is like 38 mph… thing is, I’m just not used to seeing anyone rate ship speeds in mph, hence my confusion. My main point was the difference between the actual German naval ship, vs whatever this photoshopped dirigible was supposed to be… :?

    The picture does look cool in a steampunk universe, but the Germans never pursued anything remotely close to this.


  • 2020 2019 2018 2017 '16 '15 '14 Customizer '13

    No problem. Ya I agree. I love the awesome pic.  😄


  • 2017 '16 '15 Organizer '14 Customizer '13 '12 '11 '10


  • 2020 2019 2018 2017 '16 '15 '14 Customizer '13

    Sweet !


  • 2020 2019 2018 2017 '16 '15 '14 Customizer '13 '12 '11 '10

    @Imperious:

    I found info on this!!!

    http://www.airwar1946.nl/whif/L46-lz134.htm

    A fun site for imaginary WWII air units.  A naval equivalent can be found here:

    http://www.combinedfleet.com/furashita/furamain.htm


  • 2017 '16 '15 Organizer '14 Customizer '13 '12 '11 '10

    Units on both sites are drawing board, partially developed, or fully developed naval and air units. The LZ-135 was never built, only drafted on paper and in this sense it was real.


  • 2020 2019 2018 2017 '16 '15 '14 Customizer '13 '12 '11 '10

    @Imperious:

    Unit on both sites are drawing board, partially developed, or fully developed naval and air units. The LZ-135 was never built, only drafted on paper and in this sense it was real.

    A fair point, though it should be remembered that some on-the-drawing-board concepts are less real than others.  Germany’s proposed H-Class battleships began as realistic designs in 1938 or 1939, and one or two of them were actually laid down.  When the construction work was suspended, however, drawing-board work continued on-and-off until 1944.  The design kept getting upgraded, and kept getting more and more unrealistic; from about 1941 onward, these designs can be regarded as purely paper studies, with zero chance of being built and thus little need to keep practicalities into account.  But at least they were being designed by competent naval architects, in contrast with Hitler’s propensity for sketching battleship designs on the back of envelopes.  (This fondness was an odd one, in view of his land-warfare orientation, but wasn’t entirely out of character: he believed that he knew more about warfare than his professionally-trained generals, and he similarly felt that he could come up with better battleship designs than professional naval architects.)  Hitler once proposed building a battleship armed with 800mm guns of the Gustav / Dora railway artillery type; in a rare example of common sense winning over Hitler’s fondness for gigantism (as illustrated by the 188-tonne Maus tank), an admiral managed to talk him out of the idea by pointing out that no existing German harbour was large enough to accommodate a ship big enough to carry guns of that size.


Log in to reply
 

20th Anniversary Give Away

In January 2000 this site came to life and now we're celebrating our 20th Anniversary with a prize giveaway of 30+ prizes. See this link for the list of prizes and winners.
Axis & Allies Boardgaming Custom Painted Miniatures
Dean's Army Guys
T-shirts, Hats, and More

Suggested Topics

  • 15
  • 1
  • 14
  • 4
  • 13
  • 5
  • 44
  • 18
I Will Never Grow Up Games
Axis & Allies Boardgaming Custom Painted Miniatures
Dean's Army Guys

53
Online

14.8k
Users

35.5k
Topics

1.4m
Posts