I really need advice from experienced painters.

  • '17

    @Nowhere:

    What about using a paint that has primer built-in and afterwards using a clear coat… is this a good way to paint without having to do a seperate primer first, then paint? Such as the example in the picture?

    My best answer for that is to just try it and see.  With that said, I’m of the type that I not only like to use the right tools for the job, but I also prefer to use the best tools for the job.  I would say any paints that come from the hardware store and are not specifically formulated for scale modeling, may be the right tool for the job, but probably not the best tool for the job.  They may work, but may not work the best.

    Hope that helps,
    Busarider


  • @BusaRider29:

    @SS:

    What spray can brand do you use for primer or what brand name if you prime with an airbrush BusaRider ? Where in Mich you from ?

    Greetings SS…

    The primer that I use is Tamiya brand gray, or “Fine White”.  These come in small spray cans and are a bit on the expensive side, but they are perfect for plastics and miniatures that have a lot of intricate detail, as that is what they are specifically formulated for.  The consistency of them is darn near perfect, so you get a nice smooth even coat of primer right out of the rattle can.  In the scale modeling community, Tamiya brand is “THE” brand of choice for all discriminate model builders that demand the very best quality.  It’s the best primer that I have used.  If I’m using my airbrush to prime, I use Tamiya liquid surface primer thinned to a consistency that works for me.  I’ve also used flat grays and whites from the Testors “Model Master” line of paints in my airbrush as a primer and those work good too.

    I have used Tamiya acrylics, and although they are better than any other brand of acrylics that I have used, I still find that they lack the durability that I seek.  Therefore I switched back over to using mostly Enamels and Lacquers, with Acrylics used occasionally on some things.  The downside to Enamels and Lacquers and why a lot of guys in the modeling community don’t use them is that they are hazardous chemicals and they have very strong odors and fumes, and require solvent based thinners (not water, like acrylics).  So paint in a well-ventilated area when using these.  I’m fortunate in that I built a paint booth in the hobby room of our home, where it ventilates to a vent to outside of the house.  I’ll post pictures later tonight.

    Hope this helps,
    BusaRider

    Thanks. Ya I used to have a paint booth too for my model trains. Basically weathering. The key that I’ve seen is the dam rifles like to peel from use and I do use my pieces a lot. So main reason why I asked if there was a better sticking primer.  I used to use chalks brushed on cars to give them a weathered looked. Then spray with tester’s dullcote. Have you tried using chalks ?

  • '17

    @SS:

    Where in Mich you from ?

    Mt. Haley Township area, just outside of Midland.

    -Busarider


  • @BusaRider29:

    @SS:

    Where in Mich you from ?

    Mt. Haley Township area, just outside of Midland.

    -Busarider

    You play with Mad Dog or Big Al ?

  • '17

    Thanks. Ya I used to have a paint booth too for my model trains. Basically weathering. The key that I’ve seen is the dam rifles like to peel from use and I do use my pieces a lot. So main reason why I asked if there was a better sticking primer.  I used to use chalks brushed on cars to give them a weathered looked. Then spray with tester’s dullcote. Have you tried using chalks ?

    A flat finish is going to eventually start to wear off in the high spots of the piece with a lot of handling.  Honestly, I think its probably inevitable.  As stated, you could try using a gloss clear over top of your painted finish.  Let that cure, then go back over it with a dull spray.  Be aware that I have not tried this and it is just a suggestion.  I will probably try it myself to see how it works though.  The gloss will not wear off nearly as fast as a flat finish.  Sure, with handling you will wear off the dull coat in the high spots of the piece with handling, but underneath that will be the gloss protective coat that will protect the color coat against wear.  I think the piece would still have its flat appearance as the worn off areas would only be in the high intricate edges of the piece.

    For gloss coats, try simple “Future Floor Polish”.  I think its just called “Future” now.  It is acrylic based, but it is durable.  It needs to because its formulated for use on hardwood floors.  It is one of the many “tools” in my arsenal of tools in my hobby room.  You can paint it on with a fine brush, or squirt a bit in your airbrush, thin it with some water and spray.  Because this is an acrylic, it is a “cold” base.  I have used Testor’s solvent based flat clear over the top of it, but you need to be absolutely sure that the “Future” is completely cured, and then only spray the solvent flat in very thin coats.  Wait at least 3 days before spraying over the top of “Future” with a solvent base flat clear coat, if flat coat is your final coat on your piece.

    Yes, I have a full array of pastel chalks and use them often in the weathering process for military models.

    Cheers,
    Busarider

  • '17

    You play with Mad Dog or Big Al ?

    BigAL and I just recently got in touch, so will most likely end up in his playgroup.

    Cheers,
    Busarider


  • @BusaRider29:

    You play with Mad Dog or Big Al ?

    BigAL and I just recently got in touch, so will most likely end up in his playgroup.

    Cheers,
    Busarider

    Sweet ! Dont forget Mad Dog. He has played by me and is in Holland I believe or real close to that.

  • '17

    Sweet ! Dont forget Mad Dog. He has played by me and is in Holland I believe or real close to that.

    Holland, cool.  That’s close to me too.  I own some rental properties in Zeeland, which is literally right next to Holland.  I’m pretty familiar with that area.

    Cheers,
    Busarider


  • Ya he host games too and has a great bunker room too. Just PM him on site here.

  • '17

    The key that I’ve seen is the dam rifles like to peel from use and I do use my pieces a lot. So main reason why I asked if there was a better sticking primer.

    With some specific parts of pieces, I think moderate chipping and flaking of paint is going to be inevitable, especially with the rifle ends of the infantry pieces.  Those end pieces (the rifle barrels) flex and bend around when being handled.  Therefore, you need to find a flexible primer and paint to work with that flexing.  Latex paint is one type that comes to mind.  This type of paint is used heavily by scale RC airplane guys (me included).  As a scale RC airplane is flying in the air, the wings and control surfaces get flexed.  Furthermore, fluctuations in temperature and humidity make the wooden structure of the RC plane expand and contract.  They need a paint that works with all this flexing and contracting so that the paint doesn’t flake off and chip away.  Latex paint.

    I have not tried it on scale miniature game pieces, so I cannot say with certainty if it works just as well in this arena.  All you can do is try it and see.

    Cheers,
    Busarider

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