The easiest thing Germany could have done to win the war.



  • @CWO:

    I think what AxisAndAllies1940 is referring to is the fact that, in all the territories it captured in WWII but particularly so on the Eastern Front, Germany quickly and comprehensively established a ruthless police state which shattered the illusions of the folks in the USSR who had initially regarded the German invasion as a liberation from Communist oppression.  What made the Eastern Front worse than western Europe was that a) Hitler despised “Slavs” and saw them as fit for little else than slavery, and b) Hitler despised Communists, which in part explains the Commissar Order of June 1941; and c) Hitler generally saw the war against the USSR as a “war of annihilation”.

    Remember Hitler walked the streets of Germany seeing Communist Jews trying to destroy the name he came to love so I have no doubts in my mind, him destroying both of those groups were seen as riding the world of cancer. I think he just saw USSR has a fly on the wall that needed to be quash.



  • That’s what I meant. Play up the ‘we’ve come to liberate you from the communists’ theme, and things could have gone a lot better.



  • @AxisAndAllies1940:

    That’s what I meant. Play up the ‘we’ve come to liberate you from the communists’ theme, and things could have gone a lot better.

    What I mean is that he saw Communism as cancer and you can’t liberate cancer, you destroy it.


  • 2020 2019 2018 2017 '16 '15 '14 Customizer '13 '12 '11 '10

    @AxisAndAllies1940:

    That’s what I meant. Play up the ‘we’ve come to liberate you from the communists’ theme, and things could have gone a lot better.

    Yes, but it’s important to note that ‘we’ve come to liberate you from the communists’ was just one half of the equation, the other half being what the communist rule was being replaced by.  And this where Germany’s strategy was counterproductive: it did liberate parts of Eastern Europe from communist rule, but it replaced communist rule with Nazi tyranny, and life in an SS police state soon convinced the populations of the affected regions that this trade-off was a bad bargain.  Japan made the same mistake in East Asia: its public sales pitch (if it can be called that) was that Japan was on a noble mission to liberate Asia from western imperialism, but in practice it simply replaced bad western imperialism with (arguably worse) Japanese imperialism.  As the narrator of one of Frank Capra’s “Why We Fight” films said, Japan’s concept of the “Greater East Asian Co-Prosperity Sphere” it established was that Japan would get the Prosperity and everyone else would get the “Co-”.



  • From my point of view the crucial fight for Germany was Barbarossa.
    Loosing the battle for Moscow in late 1941 meant loosing the war whereas winning that fight would have resulted in victory.

    Two thing could have been done to ensure victory.

    A) Convincing Japan not to sign the Soviet-Japanese Neutrality Pact.
    Thus the siberian divisions wouldn’t have had the opportunity to save Moscow.

    B) Not attacking Jugoslavia and Greece in spring 1941. This postponed Barbarossa for a full month which resulted in mud and ice.


  • 2020 2019 2018 2017 '16 '15 '14 Customizer '13 '12 '11 '10

    @V.:

    From my point of view the crucial fight for Germany was Barbarossa.
    Loosing the battle for Moscow in late 1941 meant loosing the war whereas winning that fight would have resulted in victory.

    Two thing could have been done to ensure victory.

    A) Convincing Japan not to sign the Soviet-Japanese Neutrality Pact.
    Thus the siberian divisions wouldn’t have had the opportunity to save Moscow.

    B) Not attacking Jugoslavia and Greece in spring 1941. This postponed Barbarossa for a full month which resulted in mud and ice.

    I doubt that Germany could have persuaded Japan not to sign the Soviet-Japanese Neutrality Pact because, arguably, it was Germany which at least in part responsible for Japan’s decision to sign it.  In late August 1939, right around when Japan lost its most recent undeclared border war with the USSR, Japan was infuriated to learn that Germany, one of its co-signatories to the Anti-Comintern Pact of 1936, had made a 180-degree U-turn and signed a non-aggression pact (the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact) with the same Soviet Union that Japan had just been fighting.  Japan’s decision to sign a similar non-aggression pact with the USSR in April 1941 was a long-term consequence of its August 1939 defeat, but Japan may also still have harboured resentment towards Germany for cozying up to Stalin in the same month that Japan had been defeated.

    Note also that the Soviet-Japanese Neutrality Pact can’t take the full credit for allowing the USSR to fight a one-front war against Germany in 1941.  Japan’s leadership, in the months leading up to Pearl Harbor, was seriously divided on Japan’s strategic options, with (in essence) the Japanese Army wanting to go “north and west” against the Soviet Union and the Japanese Navy wanting to go “south and east” against the US, the UK and the Dutch.  The Navy’s plans ultimately prevailed – in part because Japan remembered the beating it had taken during the undeclared border wars, and in part because the Japanese Army was bogged down in China and the Navy’s plans could be conducted with less Army resources than an invasion of the USSR would have required.

    The invasion of Yugoslavia and Greece, on the other hand, was indeed a foolish mistake which cost the German army five crucial weeks.  It was named “Operation Retribution”, but it could well have been called “Operation Temper Tantrum” because it was motivated, as I recall, by Hitler’s outrage over a populist uprising in Yugoslavia against the pro-Axis government.



  • History has shown that Japan was more favorable to the idea of bring USSR into the Axis but that was more for selfish reasons; easier trade with Germany.


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