• At the end of J2 my main fleet is at the Carolines, with 2 transports. I buy 2 transports to take Philipines and Kwantung. And 2 transports are in SZ 36 or even 37 (depending on allied moves of course). 1 transport is in SZ 20. Next turn the take most of the islands…

    Of course I could relocate my fleet according to allied movement. Where would your fleet be?

    And 13 landunits are in Kweichow. How are you gonna counter those with China?

    About the Japanese air power argument: I know they only can attack once per turn, but JAPAN decides were and when they attack, NOT the allies. That is the main issue here: Japan holds all or at least most strings. So you cannot say the allies are going to do this or that: JAPAN decides if they let the allies do this or that. JAPAN makes the choices, and I think they can both take China and hold the treasure islands. If they are lucky in R4, but by R5 they should have both in their pockets…

  • '15

    Thanks Tolstoj.  Alright, let’s look at the Allied options and ask some questions

    • First, I’m going to steal a question from ShadowHAwk: what do you have in SZ 36/37 to protect those transports?  You need enough there to stop a UK/Anzac 1-2 punch.  SZ37 especially would require a lot of protection, as, in this scenario, India could hit it with a BB, DD (I’m assuming the C went over to Africa) and 3 planes, followed by AZ hitting it with a DD, C and 3 fighters

    • So let’s go with your fleet at Caroline and you have transports in SZ36 with some escorts.  Right off the bat I know that as India (or Anzac) and I’m doing the following non-combat move: DD in SZ 37, preventing Japan from taking Sumatra on J3, assuring that Japan can’t get the DEI in round 3.  Japan can target the rest of the islands J4, J5 like you said, but in between you’re gonna have Anzac and US hitting those islands, trying to pick off sections of the Japanese navy, etc.

    • As far as China goes, take back Yunan and non-combat as follows: if Japanese planes are in Kwangsi, retreat to Shensi, where the planes could not reach (save for the str bombers).  China would be looking at roughly 12 inf and a fighter (not counting what Russia may come in to help with) and Japan’s counter attack would mostly be 1’s.  If Japan has their planes in a spot that can reach Shensi, head back to Sikang and eventually north.  Japan can absolutely drive China back, no doubt.  But China can hang around and be a pest

    • Another China idea: If Russia can walk into Manchuria on R3, or take it with ease, China could save its income for a turn (in my games China usually makes 15 turn 1 and 12 turn 2) and on C3 purchase 9 inf and place them in Manchuria.  What a pain it would be for Japan to kick that force out of the area

    You’re right about the Japanese air force being able to dictate where it goes.  The argument is simply that it cannot be everywhere at once, meaning the Allies can make progress on some fronts.  Will it be enough?  Maybe, maybe not.

  • '21 '20 '18 '17

    Good morning gents,

    I generally agree that the G40 game balance favors the axis.  This is not based on their advantage in pieces, or even economy–it is based on their initiative and their “white player” first mover advantage.  There are no allied strategies that can be pre-supposed to be successful until you see how the game plays out.  And, as you do gain this information, the Axis are better able to adapt and take advantage of this than the Allies are.

    I do have several suggestions that make the Allies somewhat harder to beat in the Pacific.

    1)  Move the Chinese holdout to Kansu, not Sikang or Szechwan (“Chicom”).  Retaking Yunnan is tempting, but if Japan already has their MIC down, it is probably better to draw them Northwest than South.  If Japan intends to attack Russia, being up north is not a problem for them, but if they have to chase you that direction, it puts them out of position to attack UK Pacific.  If Japan does not have a plan to strike Russia, it will be fairly obvious (abandons Manchuria), and it would then argue for keeping all 18 infantry there to pin down any Japanese troops (and block a retake of Korea, if that happens).
    2)  Russia will often have to move their pieces West, but if they don’t, and Japan doesn’t build its MIC in the north, then it cannot possibly defend against Russia, China, UKPac, ANZAC and US.
    3)  The primary US goal is to pressurize SZ6 and take Korea, going south puts you way out of position.  Building a Naval Base on Wake or Midway makes it impossible to screen you out from SZ 6.  Even if you lose the battle, you can reduce the threat, expend his kamikazes and follow up.  If his fleet goes south, you can screen it by blocking SZ 21-23and “break him in two” by preventing his separate fleets from all converging back on you. 
    4) on J3-J4, Japan will try to make threshold income by taking the spice islands, and this is what will cost them a bunch of their ships.  Fighters on Australia, malasia and NGuinea and US carriers can attack detached fleets.
    5) After Taranto, land your planes on Malta, not Syria.  This pulls Italy west instead of East just like Chicom pulls them north not south.  If Italy can cross the oil states, UK Pac is finished.
    6) if Japan threatens UK Pac directly, buy only infantry and camp within one space of your capital.  Their goal should be to take over Ceylon and use it as a landing pad.  Screen SZ 37.  But if they don’t, packs of UK mechs and tanks can ward any Japanese stack within range.  You will likely only get to make a single attack to retake Siam, Malasia, Yunnan etc…Make it count.
    7) Declare war with UK2-UK3 if this is the only way you can gain your bonuses on a certain turn.  The penalty in the Pac game is that the US loses its bonus, but there is no bonus in the Global setup.
    8) you cannot directly bomb Japan into submission or retake it with force.  You have to smash its income by destroying its ability to move in and out of SZ6.

    Japan can do everything, and can smash any stack, but they have to telegraph that intention at least one turn ahead.  They can take all the territory they like, the only reply is to trim them back slightly.

    Many of the conversations here try to focus on the exact detail of where certain ships and captures will occur on turns 3-6, and how many of those moves can be accomplished simultaneously.    This isn’t very productive, as it tends to exaggerate how thinly Japan can practically be spread, and implies a false sense of certainty about what they will do.  They do have a ridiculous amount of planes–and it actually is quite a good idea to use the Japan Dark Skies strat to kill every Chinese piece even with sacrifices.  You will not be able to focus every US dollar on the Pacific, but you can get pretty close.  Beating either axis player in detail is uncertain, cannot be accomplished by naked gambits or stratagems, and requires patience.

    However, I have never seen a scenario where (for example) all the UK air and all the Siberian forces converge on the defense of Moscow.  Everyone says that this is possible and desirable, but it never happens, and Russia falls.  I am not that certain that G40 is all that unbalanced, assuming that the Allies take extreme measures to prevent endgame.  It is simply an unplayably long game (More than 10 turns, tending to 14-16, we did 8 in 12 hours…) that people analyze on the basis of assumptions, the conduct of the early game, and their personal observations and biases.


  • Hi there,

    Thanks for these challenging questions, I hope I can provide a solid answer to them all:

    1. The transports in SZ 37/36 will be protected according to the strenght of UK presence. If UK does attack I don’t have to worry about the US in US3. My opponents usually combine the allied fleet, but if you don’t I don’t need much ships at the Carolines either. ANZAC is not within range, or else they are destroyed. ANZAC doesn’t know when I attack you see, and I can always change my mind. If I can destroy the entire ANZAC-navy in J2, I might just do that instead.

    In my calculations the US can only have about 25 pieces in US4 to attack SZ6. Japan has 19 Air units alone as you know, and 20 fleet units (when I buy 1 carrier, 2 destroyers and 4 submarines). So Japan has about 14 units to defend against ANZAC/UK. Please correct me if I am wrong.

    2. Okay I destroy some of your ships in J3 and take the rest of the treasure islands in J4. Sometimes I put infantry from Siam inside my transports in J2, to ship them away in J3 (this way it is harder to block).

    3. I think you miscalculate. Fighters can reach Shensi and land in Kweichow. So if you move to Shensi the Chinese army will be destroyed in J3. I think the Chinese forces should move to Sikang, that way they live another round. But actually I sometimes withdraw to Shensi in C1, because in C3 I can reach Kansu, wich can more easily be defended by the Russians.

    And my fighters are in Ahnwe if the US is treatening SZ 6 actually. From there they can also reach every territory in China.

    4. How the hell are the Russians walking into Manchuria with 18 infantry (in J3)??? I usually declare war on them at once. If all 18 infantry (or less) are in Amur I destroy them in J1. So usually I trade Amur with Russia a couple of times (after they retreated to Buryatia) before they are out of infantry (in our games the Russians recieve an extra bomber to do that).

    5. When you talk about attacking Yunnan (above Burma) with UK units. Which round are you referring to? Again, attacking in UK2 means I don’t have to worry about the US in J3 at all!

  • '15

    Brief reply since I’m leaving work shortly (clearly I’ve been working hard today)

    -I did miscalculate Shensi.  This is what happens when you try to post while on a conference call.  So Sinkang would be the right move on C2 (after taking back Yunan with as few units as possible)

    -You can probably take the islands J4, no doubt.  But can you hold them all, every turn?  Can you take them back every turn?  Maybe, but you’re also doing it at the cost of ships and ground units.  All I’m trying to say about the DEI is that holding them is more difficult than acquiring them in the first place

    -Re: Russian infantry, it’s simple: turn one all Siberian troops move to Buryatia.  R2 they all move to Amur, R3 they all move to Manchuria.  As Japan, are you willing to commit the resources needed to attack them in Amur on J2?  Again, you can do this, but you’re going to lose a good chunk in the process and set yourself back in other areas.


  • I just observed a game where on J3 Japan had 15 different 100% combats, only 2 of which could be countered by Allies on the next turn (neither one important, and neither counter sustainable), while creating no positional weakness.

    It was a very on-point demonstration of the power in the Japan G40 setup. Allies didn’t make any mistakes that I could see, and there was no particular brilliance involved it was just what was there for Japan to do.


  • I haven’t tested this, but what if while you were setting up the game, you put 1 extra Chinese infantry on all the provinces they control, and then don’t do any other setup changes or bid?


  • Does anyone else just move the infantry in Korea over to Manhcuria and just… keep all the starting Manchurian infantry there? It’s what I normally do when the Russians stack Amur. 10 infantry and an AA gun is bad odds for the 18 Russian infantry up there. Yes, it leaves Korea open, but I’m generally okay with that because they can’t go anywhere else from there. Stacking Korea allows the Russian infantry to go all the way down the coast and become a real nuisance, so I usually just… write off the 10 infantry in Manchuria as insurance against the Soviets.


  • I do the same. If the Russians stack all their infantry there, I just leave the 10 inf and AA gun in Manchuria. If they do attack Korea, then I’m fine with it because then I can expand into Russian territory without activating the Mongolians. It only really gets annoying when the USA takes Korea and then the Russians reinforce with all their guys.


  • @taamvan:

    Good morning gents,

    I generally agree that the G40 game balance favors the axis.   This is not based on their advantage in pieces, or even economy–it is based on their initiative and their “white player” first mover advantage.  There are no allied strategies that can be pre-supposed to be successful until you see how the game plays out.   And, as you do gain this information, the Axis are better able to adapt and take advantage of this than the Allies are.

    I do have several suggestions that make the Allies somewhat harder to beat in the Pacific.

    1)  Move the Chinese holdout to Kansu, not Sikang or Szechwan (“Chicom”).  Retaking Yunnan is tempting, but if Japan already has their MIC down, it is probably better to draw them Northwest than South.   If Japan intends to attack Russia, being up north is not a problem for them, but if they have to chase you that direction, it puts them out of position to attack UK Pacific.  If Japan does not have a plan to strike Russia, it will be fairly obvious (abandons Manchuria), and it would then argue for keeping all 18 infantry there to pin down any Japanese troops (and block a retake of Korea, if that happens).
    2)  Russia will often have to move their pieces West, but if they don’t, and Japan doesn’t build its MIC in the north, then it cannot possibly defend against Russia, China, UKPac, ANZAC and US.
    3)   The primary US goal is to pressurize SZ6 and take Korea, going south puts you way out of position.  Building a Naval Base on Wake or Midway makes it impossible to screen you out from SZ 6.  Even if you lose the battle, you can reduce the threat, expend his kamikazes and follow up.   If his fleet goes south, you can screen it by blocking SZ 21-23and “break him in two” by preventing his separate fleets from all converging back on you. 
    4) on J3-J4, Japan will try to make threshold income by taking the spice islands, and this is what will cost them a bunch of their ships.  Fighters on Australia, malasia and NGuinea and US carriers can attack detached fleets.
    5) After Taranto, land your planes on Malta, not Syria.  This pulls Italy west instead of East just like Chicom pulls them north not south.  If Italy can cross the oil states, UK Pac is finished.
    6) if Japan threatens UK Pac directly, buy only infantry and camp within one space of your capital.  Their goal should be to take over Ceylon and use it as a landing pad.  Screen SZ 37.  But if they don’t, packs of UK mechs and tanks can ward any Japanese stack within range.  You will likely only get to make a single attack to retake Siam, Malasia, Yunnan etc…Make it count.
    7) Declare war with UK2-UK3 if this is the only way you can gain your bonuses on a certain turn.   The penalty in the Pac game is that the US loses its bonus, but there is no bonus in the Global setup.
    8) you cannot directly bomb Japan into submission or retake it with force.   You have to smash its income by destroying its ability to move in and out of SZ6.

    Japan can do everything, and can smash any stack, but they have to telegraph that intention at least one turn ahead.   They can take all the territory they like, the only reply is to trim them back slightly.

    Many of the conversations here try to focus on the exact detail of where certain ships and captures will occur on turns 3-6, and how many of those moves can be accomplished simultaneously.    This isn’t very productive, as it tends to exaggerate how thinly Japan can practically be spread, and implies a false sense of certainty about what they will do.   They do have a ridiculous amount of planes–and it actually is quite a good idea to use the Japan Dark Skies strat to kill every Chinese piece even with sacrifices.   You will not be able to focus every US dollar on the Pacific, but you can get pretty close.   Beating either axis player in detail is uncertain, cannot be accomplished by naked gambits or stratagems, and requires patience.

    However, I have never seen a scenario where (for example) all the UK air and all the Siberian forces converge on the defense of Moscow.  Everyone says that this is possible and desirable, but it never happens, and Russia falls.   I am not that certain that G40 is all that unbalanced, assuming that the Allies take extreme measures to prevent endgame.  It is simply an unplayably long game (More than 10 turns, tending to 14-16, we did 8 in 12 hours…) that people analyze on the basis of assumptions, the conduct of the early game, and their personal observations and biases.

    First off, I want to give a shout out to taamvan. Well said, good sir.

    Secondly:

    Does anyone else just move the infantry in Korea over to Manhcuria and just… keep all the starting Manchurian infantry there? It’s what I normally do when the Russians stack Amur. 10 infantry and an AA gun is bad odds for the 18 Russian infantry up there. Yes, it leaves Korea open, but I’m generally okay with that because they can’t go anywhere else from there. Stacking Korea allows the Russian infantry to go all the way down the coast and become a real nuisance, so I usually just… write off the 10 infantry in Manchuria as insurance against the Soviets.

    I do the same. If the Russians stack all their infantry there, I just leave the 10 inf and AA gun in Manchuria. If they do attack Korea, then I’m fine with it because then I can expand into Russian territory without activating the Mongolians. It only really gets annoying when the USA takes Korea and then the Russians reinforce with all their guys.

    Bad odds for the Russians to attack? They’d have a 61% chance of success vs 12 infantry (or 90% in low luck), let alone 10 and a half. Stacking Manchuria with enough to simply hold the Soviets off is a viable plan, but it’s going to take more than that. If that’s all you have, the Russian player SHOULD attack you. If he doesn’t, that’s on him.
    Like Nippon-koku mentioned, the Chinese would love to get the Manchurian money and spawn location.

  • '15

    @EnoughSaid:

    Bad odds for the Russians to attack? They’d have a 61% chance of success vs 12 infantry (or 90% in low luck), let alone 10 and a half. Stacking Manchuria with enough to simply hold the Soviets off is a viable plan, but it’s going to take more than that. If that’s all you have, the Russian player SHOULD attack you. If he doesn’t, that’s on him.
    Like Nippon-koku mentioned, the Chinese would love to get the Manchurian money and spawn location.

    Exactly.  Not sure if it’s because of the 1’s, but people seem to underestimate the Siberians.  Ran the calc and the highest probability was Russia survives with 11 infantry.  Non-combat those two AA guns and Japan has an issue (and that’s before China places units up there).

    Again, not a bulletproof end-all be-all strategy to beat Japan.  But another example of how you can slow Japan down, and how it would take more than a simple “Well I’d just do this and the problem would be solved” to slow down the Allies.


  • The plan to threaten Manchuria in this way is a solid plan. Usually my opponent only has 12 infantry in Buryatia at the start of R2. That is nog enough. You need the 18 infantry. I will certainly try that next time.

    But when I am playing Japan and I see 18 infantry threatening Amur, I keep most of my infantry in Manchuria and my planes in Jehol in J1. If they take it, Japan can attack with maybe 23 units plus landings. And they will do so immediately! That way both the Russians and the Chinese are defeated in one stroke, and Germany will have less trouble to take Moscow. Not only will Russia lose it’s 18 infantry, it will also lose all it’s IPC’s in the east…

    China
    When you stay in Szechwan in C2, you cannot go back to Kansu which is easier to defend by the Russians. So every infantry you invest in Szechwan will be lost in J4 in my opinion. That is why I retreat to Shensi in C1. That way I am in Kansu in C3 and the Russians (6 infantry) can help in R4.

  • '15

    I believe China will always be better off trying to get Yunan back early on.  We may just agree to disagree on that one.  No worries there  :-)

    As for the 18 in Amur

    Your Amur plan goes back to the question we’ve been going back and forth on: how much is too much to do for Japan?  If you’re committing 23 ground units, and accompanying transports, to Amur on J2 you simply don’t have enough units in position to push back China + UK in Southern China and aggressively threaten the DEI.  If, as China and India, I see Japan commit that much to the North then I’m thinking move everything China has into Yunan, then back it up with India.  Now Yunan is protected and Japan has no serious DEI threat J3.


  • But with how many Chinese units are you willing to retake Yunnan? They will have to be left behind in Szechwan. Japan can react to that, so I think it is a waste. And Japan can always kill them with airpower…

    Japan doesn’t need 23 ground units, perhaps 15 will be enough. And you are right that taking all the islands in J3 will be almost impossible, but Japan has solved it’s problems on land early in the game. And will you seriously put 18 Russian infantry forward when Japan can destroy them all in one stroke?

    When you have taken the islands it will be easy for Japan to keep them! The allies will have more dificulties retaking the islands then Japan has on taking them back, because the Japanese navy is better situated (it can use airpower from carriers or from land to retake the islands). Only if the allied fleet is at Queensland can the allies have better access to the islands. But then the Japanese homeland is safe…

  • '15

    Let me preface by saying I’m enjoying this back and forth.  Tone is never present in online discussions and therefore words can come off the wrong way.  Just know I’m loving the discussion  :-D

    Said respectfully, I feel like your Japanese plans never include the fact that the Allies get to buy units and move as well.

    The US and Anzac will be steadily buying ships, planes and units as well.  To maintain, and constantly retake, the DEI is worthwhile for Japan, but it’s certainly not easy or without cost.  You will lose transports, men, and if you spread your force too thin trying to protect too much you’ll eventually get picked off.  Again, Japan is strong and can certainly win the game.  But it’s not as simple as saying “Japan will just take the DEI and hold them the whole time!”  I’ve never played a single game of Global where Japan took the DEI J3 or J4 and held them virtually uncontested the rest of the way.

    Let’s get back to China and Russia

    In an earlier post you said you like to have the main Japanese fleet situated at the Caroline islands, plus a transport in 36/37 with some protection.  You later mentioned you keep planes in Jehol.  So let’s look at the setup going into round 2:

    Russia moves 18 men and 2 AA into Amur; you want to counter with 15 ground units and some planes.  Ok, no problem.

    First things first, you’d have to anticipate Russia moving into Amur R2, meaning you’d have to leave back the Manchuria troops.  So right off the bat Russia is, as the very least, dictating where your units have to go.  Not a game breaker, but a nice ancillary benefit for the Allies.  Moreover, you’d have to commit a couple of transports.  Again, nice play for the Allies.  Finally, since you’re doing the attack, you’ve now activated Mongolia and given Russia 6 extra troops.  Once again, not a game changer, but still nice.  Finally, let’s say you do have all your Manchurian troops still there, and your Korean troops, and transports ready to go, and half your air force in Jehol: Russia sees that and decides to sit in Buryatia on R2.  So now what as Japan?  You aren’t going to keep that entire air force in Jehol, right?  You’re going to move those transports down toward the DEI, right?  So Russia made you keep your men out of place for J2, then just moves into Amur on R3.  What’s the next step?  I’m guessing you’re not going to redirect your entire air force to Northern China on J3?

    As far as planes go, I’m guessing on J1 you hit Yunan with 3 inf, 1 art, 1 ftr & 1 tac from Shanghai, 2 str from Japan.  Let me know if I’m wrong, but this seems to be the standard as far as I can tell, since taking Yunan is important for J1.  Those planes would have to land in Kwangsi, and I’m guessing you have at least a couple of your carriers loaded up in the water?  And you at least brought a couple to Hunan?  It’s very unlikely that you have your entire air force in Jehol.

    As far as the Japanese homeland goes, I rarely find that it’s prudent for the US to spend heavy time and resources threatening SZ6.  Ultimate, it just puts them out of position and let’s Japan do exactly what you said: control the DEI.  Trust me, as the Allies I will have plenty of loaded carrier power down in Queensland around turn 4, 5.

    Lastly, you mentioned that if China retakes Yunan and has to sit in Szechwan, they are susceptible to Japanese air strikes.  I mentioned earlier in the thread that China can have about 12 inf, a ftr and 4 Russian units in Szechwan by the time J2 rolls around.  Now, certainly you agree: the Japanese air force cannot be a threat to that stack, AND a threat to Amur, AND sitting on your carriers at the beginning of J2?


  • Indeed, I to like to have an open debate without ‘tone’ or disrespect. I want to learn from others, and of course I think I am right sometimes, I have also learnt from this discussion. Next time I play the allies, I will certainly have a different approach. I will try to involve the Russians more and perhaps coordinate in what turn the allies should put pressure on Japan collectively.

    But still think Japan is to strong! ;)

    Fleet
    The allies can buy, but not enough. You can only have a maximum of 19 units at Queensland in US4 (if you buy 3 carriers in US1). Japan has around 35 at that time (and can buy more, the US can’t). And you’re welcome to try to take the islands (which indeed always happens), but Japan not only has the advantage of a large unified force, it is also better situated to take the islands back. So in fact the allies lose more units then Japan in this manner. But the reward is more IPC’s, so we agree that they should try.

    Russia/China
    Japan has 19 air units. 4 are used in attack on Yunnan in J1 and 3 in Hunan. That leaves 12 planes, plus the bombers which can reach amur from Kwangsi… . 6 planes are used at sea, so Japan has 8 left on Jehol. Japan has 11 landunits on Manchuria plus Korea, and 5 transports in J2. Must be enough.

    If you don’t attack in R2, Japan has to re-arrange of course. But from Ahnwe it can reach the whole of China and Manchuria (and Burma). So contrary to what you say the Japanese airforce can threaten northern China and Manchuria at the same time.

    Germany would love Russia to invest 4 extra units in China by the way (Szechwan). And again from Ahnwe the Japanese airforce can indeed be a threat to those units. In fact if you don’t put the 18 Russian units forward in Manchuria the forces in Szechwan will all be destroyed in J3…

    Still I don’t see how you are going to safe China???

    IPC
    My assumption is that if Japan takes the treasure islands one time, they have around 70 IPC. If they do they can buy as many ships as the Americans, and the US has to divert power to Europe. Japan also has the advantage of airpower (I like to drop this argument as often as I can :p), of inner lines and they are closer to the islands then the US homebase is.

  • '21 '20 '18 '17

    Mr. Tolstoi,

    Can’t really contradict you, as the things you say are correct–Japan gets the income, it gets the air, it gets the flexibility.

    The only blatantant weakness it has are

    1. limited ground (cannon-fodder) on the continent, which it can address with MICs to the detriment of its fleet assets
    2. the moment it has to grab for the big cookie jar (DEI, spice islands, Malaya) is the only chance you have to split him in half.

    In agreement with the poster above, you cant just threaten SZ 6, you have to be ready to attack it at the only opportunity you will have (usually J4-J6) when he splits his fleet.

    If japan hangs out at Carolines, you cant sit off Queensland.
    If japan hangs out at the Philippines, it is the southernmost point he can be and still return to SZ 6 defense
    If japan hangs out in SZ 6, he isn’t accomplishing anything
    If japan hangs out in Manchuria, he can’t kill China
    If japan goes for Malaya, the Spice Islands, Australia, Bombay etc, he cannot help SZ 6

    This set of assumptions reveals that the only positional moment to attack him will be the one where he has to grab for his true objective.    That battle will be at a odds disadvantage to the allies, but you have to take it.

    This is also my (mild) objection to the discussion of how to speed the game up by having Germany and Japan go at the same time–seems like a good idea until you recognize that certain G1 moves (sea lion) will not be compatible with a certain Japan move (attacking Russia)…and Russia has to ‘read’ this intention…

    People often opine that Russia should not put all 18 men on Amur, but this battle is very risky for Japan and I have seen it blow Japan’s strategy before.  I think that it is a “tell” to move all the pieces to Buryatia facing westward…Japan must have some doubt that you will be leaving permanently and not re-forming up in Amur/novosibirisk.  Japan can’t lose Manchuria and that’s the biggest difference between 1940 Pac and 1940 Global.


  • This is all clear language Mr. Taamvan, thank you.

    One question, what do you ean by:

    This set of assumptions reveals that the only positional moment to attack him will be the one where he has to grab for his true objective. That battle will be at a odds disadvantage to the allies, but you have to take it.


  • Fist of all Japans has 4 destroyers to start with, and the US should buy 3 carriers in US1. (I never buy battleships). Japan has two advantages: they buy ships nearer to homebase and they are first.

    J2 Japan buys a carrier (or 2 destroyers) and 2 subs.
    J3 Japan buys a carrier and 2 subs.

    Japanese navy: 5 carriers 2 bb 2 ca 4 destroyers 6 subs = 29 units + airsupport. And may I remind you that Japan isn’t the one who’s on the attack!


  • I dont know if you are assuming a J1 or not.  If I assume that you do a J3 attack

    2 CV, 1 BB, 2 CR, 3 DD and 2 sub
    If us Buy 3 CV on US1 and 3CV on us2, they will end up with
    8 CV, 1 BB, 2 CR, 3 DD and 2 subs for a total of 32 units that can reach queensland by US5

    You can also go this way:
    on US1 buy 7 subs and 1 DD
    US2 buy 3 Carriers. You now have
    5 CV, 1 BB, 2 Cr, 4DD and 9 subs for a total of 29 units + anzak that can reach queensland on US4 (I assume anzak and uk helps with filling up the US carriers)
    The subs you build on US1 can actually go from the east coast to hawaii by US3.

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