All the Russian openings: For Begginers


  • 2017 2016 2015

    And that one’s out of here!

    LMFAO reading that Black Elk! A few of my favorites  “a huge wall of Russian infantry”, “Once you achieve super stack status”, “if your wall is giant enough”, “total cardboard world domination”!

    That is too good! But yea, I try and keep Russia less than 2:1 infantry, artillery myself. I hate to waste the extra buck(being the cheap *&%$#@! that I am) but it’s way worth it.
    Good Stuff Man!


  • 2019 2018 2017 2016

    Black Elk - 42.2 arrived today so I had a quick look for advice on the forum and found this post from you.

    Having only just benefitted from all your time and help regarding 1941 strategy I am quite simply gobsmacked by your deep knowledge and your willingness to share.

    You are a star Black Elk!

    😄


  • 2019 2018 2017 2016 2015 '14 '13 Moderator

    Enjoy your new game, Private Panic.


  • 2019 2018 2017 2016

    Thanks wittman!

    BTW - sent you an instant message - did you get it?  Not showing in my outbox.

    Cheers
    PP


  • 2019 2018 2017 2016 2015 '14 '13 Moderator

    You need to tick the box at the bottom of the message. On the left, I think.



  • @wittmann:

    You need to tick the box at the bottom of the message. On the left, I think.

    Messages still send successfully even if you haven’t saved it to your own outbox.


  • 2019 2018 2017 2016

    Thanks  🙂


  • '14

    Hi private panick! Nice to see you in the 1942.2 section  😄

    I’m busy with work this weekend, but plan to return to this thread soon with some thoughts on sz16, since I think the decision of whether to keep it open or close it off, has a definite impact on the Russian situation. Meantime, hopefully you can find some cool threads in this forum to keep you busy with strategy planning.

    Catch you guys soon!
    best Elk


  • '14

    (Pulled from another thread for safe keeping)

    Still thinking about general strategies for the five player nations on this board, and building up to a German strategy guide little by little in my mind, but I wanted to pause this morning and just describe one Allied move that I’m rather fond of on this board with USA.

    I’ve referred to it in the past as “the Iceland fighter transit”, or “the fighter launch” from sz 11 to Moscow in 2 moves.

    Usually I will plan this move as a round 3 set up for USA, in KGF focused games. It is my favorite use for the starting US Pacific carrier in sz 53 (should this survive J1), if you want to move that Carrier from the Pacific to the Atlantic to support a European campaign. There are a number of purchases you can make during the first 3 rounds to support this play, I like to buy a destroyer and a carrier for sz 11 on USA1, but I just want to describe the situation here in terms of the starting units first.

    The sz 53 fighter flies off the Carrier deck to land in W. Australia on USA1, then flies to India on USA2 for Calcutta defense.

    The sz 53 fleet itself moves to sz 41, to guard the British as they make their way around South America (New Zealand evac). These ships are joined by the 1 fighter from Hawaii on USA1. This American fleet will move from sz 41 to sz 22 Brazil on USA2. The fighter can detach from the carrier on the second round, or stay with the deck in sz 22, it’s up to you. But I like to detach and fly from sz 41 either to W. Australia or Equatorial Africa/Congo so it can reach India the following round. Note if you take the Africa route for this fighter from sz 41, your flight path in round 3 is through Sudan, so it can land in India for defense.

    Sz 41 is the fastest way to get the Hawaiian fighter to the Center/India that I’ve been able to find. It takes the same amount of moves as going any other direction. So I just go to sz 41 on USA1 with the Hawaiin fighter, and launch the fighter from there on USA2, with plans to land it in India on USA3. This is a better play I think, than going to Eastern Australia, or Central USA, or Alaska with the fighter from Hawaii on USA1.

    The sz 56 fleet moves to sz 19 Panama on USA1, and on to sz 11 East Coast on USA2.

    On round 3 you will purchase 2 USA fighters, to set up the Iceland transit in earnest. Whatever starting naval forces you purchased in the Atlantic up until this point, will converge with the British in sz 13 Morocco, to begin Operation Torch against North Africa. During this same 3rd round, your Pacific carrier will move to sz 11 on Non Com, where it will remain for the next several rounds to receive newly purchased fighters placed directly into sz 11. From this point on, the carrier deck will serve as a launching pad for newly purchased fighters on their way to Moscow/W.Russia via Iceland.The rest of your USA Atlantic forces are free to roam about and threaten amphibious landings, but this one carrier deck will remain in sz 11, to do its main job of fighter launching.

    By the 3rd round USA will still be collecting into the high 30’s, usually between 36-38 ipcs. 20 of these ipcs will be dedicated to fighter purchases from round 3 on, which leaves a safe 16-18 ipcs for ground purchases (eventually more if USA can recover the lost income from China elsewhere on the map). What this means is that by round 3 you will want at least 3 transports, to move about 16-18 ipcs worth of ground out of North America every turn. If your starting transports somehow survive the initial German u-boat attack (or if Germany goes after the British instead) then you will begin play at advantage, if not these transports need to be replaced ASAP, for the purposes of moving ground towards fortress Europa.

    The basic idea is this: on the 3rd round (and for many rounds thereafter) the USA will be purchasing 2 fighters a round, dropping them in sz 11, then flying to Iceland and from there directly to Moscow. This means 2 USA fighters in Iceland on round 4, which can land in Moscow/W. Russia on round 5. Or a fighter launch off your sz 11 carrier that is two rounds out from Moscow, for all newly purchased fighters from that point on (optimally 2 fighters, but at least 1 fighter per round, as income allows.)

    Round 4, is when USA will take over the “Fighter Wall” purchasing role from UK, and provide direct fighter aid to Russia via the Iceland transit. This allows the British to begin purchasing Atlantic naval units, or to begin using the fighters they have purchased up until that point, for purposes beyond simple Moscow defense. In other words, the UK will make 3 rounds of Spitfire purchases to prop up Russia initially, after round 4 and beyond, it will be USA that takes over the job of sending fighters.

    It is usually exactly around this time, that the UK’s total income will start to diminish to the point where fighter purchases are no longer viable for them. And it is also around this time that the German drive against Moscow will begin to make the UK to W. Russia/Archangel fighter transit less tenable. At precisely the point when the UK will have to start making serious compromises during their purchase units phase (e.g. when they need to start preparing for amphibious assaults vs Europe instead of Fighters to aid Russia) the USA will arrive from Iceland to take over and keep the center from collapsing.

    It is possible to do this same move with a newly purchased USA carrier, instead of the Pacific sz 53 carrier. Or alternatively to use 2 carriers together in sz 11, to try and magnify the fighter launch, but I find that USA doesn’t have enough cash to make the most of a double deck launch in sz 11 (since that requires a minimum of 30 ipcs spent on 3 fighters to activate.) 1 carrier is usually enough, and the sz 53 Pacific carrier, is conveniently 3 rounds out from sz 11, giving USA two game rounds of purchasing to help set up the play. It is also possible to set an Iceland transit from the second round instead of the third, if you want to launch your 2 starting fighters off a newly purchased sz 11 carrier (bought on USA1), but this can stall your Torch options by a full round. It depends how urgent USA fighter support is to the defense of Moscow, but sometimes I will consider that play too.

    On USA1 purchase, assuming Germany sank your starting transports, I enjoy 1 carrier (to be stacked with existing fighters) 1 destroyer, 2 transports. This is your “roaming carrier” the one that will be used for early Torch operations, and the two fighters that land on it will not be part of it the Iceland transit, but instead “glued” to this roaming deck for defense vs German air until later rounds. This leaves USA with a remainder of 6 ipcs. If Germany sank your transports with two U-boats surviving in sz 11, or if U-boats went for the double hit and destroyed the British in sz 10 as well, you might wish to spend that 6 ipcs on an additional Atlantic sub (for an extra fodder hit, which can be helpful in clearing the Atlantic.) Otherwise you can save that 6 ipcs for purchasing during the second round.

    On USA2 purchase, I like 1 additional transport, 1 ground unit, and as many bombers as you can afford. This will give you a total of 4 loaded transports, or 2 alternating transports which can be used to launch at least 4 ground a round out of E. USA/Central USA into Africa. Some people call this a “Shuck.” If you plan a round in advance, this allows you to place 4 ground in W. USA for Japan defense, then move them to Central USA the following round, where they can load into sz 11.

    The bombers, purchased in round 2, can rush to Moscow or India by round 4 to provide additional defensive fodder (wherever it is most needed). I like to make this bomber purchase early, as it will help to support subsequent fighter purchases on the Iceland transit, giving them more cumulative attack power. 20 ipcs a round will be dedicated to Iceland fighter launching, with the remainder spent on shucking ground into Africa, until you have secured the center/Moscow, and allowed the UK Atlantic fleet to become fully operational against Germany. At this point, you switch can switch from dedicated Iceland fighter purchases, to setting up the main expeditionary force for the Atlantic crossing (ie 1 less fighter per round, and more ground/transports to threaten amphibious.)

    Optimally this will be between 3-6 newly purchased UK fighters (plus the starting fighters) to aid Russia/India in the first 3 rounds of game play. And then an additional 4-6 US fighters for that same purpose, during the next 3 rounds. Basically 6 rounds of dedicated fighter purchasing from the Allies to prop up the Russian capital and hold the Indian VC for as long as possible, while securing Africa/Suez in the process.  In round 7, once the Moscow fighter wall is established (with two more US Iceland fighters on the way), you can start purchasing heavy ground rather than fighters for the main Atlantic crossing to set up the eventual hit on Berlin, and release the carrier from sz 11. A dozen or more Western Air units in Russia by the 7th round, to prevent the Axis from cracking the center, making an early Moscow crush an extremely bloody proposition for Germany. By maintaining control of the Center and Suez, the game changes from one that hinges entirely on the Russian capital to one that hinges on control of Berlin. Taking Berlin will secure the Allied endgame, regardless of whether Japan takes Moscow, so that is the race you will be playing, in proper KGF fashion.

    The reason I like the Iceland fighter transit, is that it focuses on the movement advantage and overall power of the fighter unit, and gives you the fastest possible route to put USA fighters into Moscow: 2 rounds from sz 11. All the other transits to the Russian capital require a stop over in territories that Axis can threaten, or onto carriers in sea zones that Axis can threaten with air attacks. Iceland on the other hand is relatively secure. Iceland makes little sense for a UK Fighter transit, since you end up wasting too many movement points at too little advantage, but for a US fighter transit it is ideal. 4 spaces from sz 11 to Iceland, and another 4 spaces from Iceland to Moscow. So all you need to set it up is a carrier in sz 11.

    One more tool in the toolbox! I don’t use it in every game, but it can be a lot of fun if you want to go fighter heavy with USA.
    😄


  • '14

    For more ideas like these you can also check out the general strategy guide I tried to put together for 1942.2
    http://www.axisandallies.org/forums/index.php?topic=35703.0

    Or the German openers thread, which is still being developed with discussions.
    http://www.axisandallies.org/forums/index.php?topic=35951.0

    Have fun and good game all!
    😄


  • '14

    Another Russian opener, which has not yet been properly considered in this thread. The tricky Tank on Non Com! haha
    😄

    Earlier we spent some time discussing the strong advantages of stacking W. Russia (especially to deadzone the Karelia factory). I also briefly mentioned some ways different ways that Caucasus can be handled on R1, most of those focused on baits and on tank trapping, ie light defenses of Caucasus. Well, another way to handle things is to hold 1 tank in reserve for non-combat. The concept here is to use your lone tank for a positional advantage against Japan on R2, while still being able to return to the optimal locations against Germany on R3, when it will be needed most.

    Ex. 1 Tank launches to Szech on Non-Combat to cover the Flying Tiger through the first round, and then returns to Caucasus in the second. This frees up the Kazakh infantry to help defend Caucasus, instead of going on Flying Tiger protection. The advantage of using a tank instead of the infantry unit is two-fold. First you get a better defense value at 3 (instead of 2) but you also gain a two round movement advantage as well, since the Tank move out and back in two 2 turns, whereas the infantry takes 3.

    or another option is 1 tank held in reserve, launches to Evenki on Non-Combat, then returns to W. Russia on R2.
    or 1 tank held back, then launched to Yakut or Sinkiang on Non-Combat and then returns to Moscow on R2.
    Those are the other most common variants I’ve seen, but the 1 tank to Szech play is probably the strongest of the these.

    With this sort of opening, you usually want a strong armor advantage build, at least 1 tank purchased, 2 or even 3! in order to back the Germans off you during the second round.

    Once you get up to about 13 total hitpoints in the W. Russia battle (ie. you are bringing most of your armor and all of your artillery to the fight) there is statistically not much difference between bringing 13 total hitpoints or 19 total hitpoints into the fight. Unless you are willing to bring 20 hitpoints (all 12 infantry in range) The Germans still have an average shot of picking off 3 units.

    If for example, you take say…
    5 infantry, 3 artillery, 3 tanks, and 2 fighters into the W. Russia battle, that’s 13 units in the fight against Germany’s 5.
    100% odds to the attacker, with an average of 10.85 units remaining out of 13

    6 infantry instead, an average of 11.85 units remaining out of 14
    7 infantry, an average of 12.9 units remaining out of 15.
    8 infantry, an average 13.95 units remaining out of 16.
    9 infantry its an average of 14.9 units remaining out of 17.
    10 infantry its an average of 15.95 units remaining out of 18.
    11 infantry its an average of 16.95 units remaining out of 19.
    12 infantry its an average of basically 18 units remaining out of 20.

    The point is, if you’re holding 1 tank in reserve, it doesn’t really matter how many infantry you bring to the W. Russia fight beyond 5, because unless you bring all 20, you’re still not going to break that threshold of facing 3 hits on average. So what this means, is that you could also hold that infantry in reserve, if for some reason you’d like to try something tricky on Non-Com defenses, you’re not really losing out all that much on average units remaining, at least when you’re trying to keep the 4th tank in reserve.

    Consider the difference between what people are usually willing to risk in W. Russia when they go for a multi-attack opening, and you can see how bringing the fighters and 3 tanks into W. Russia can really help to ice that fight. If things go very well, you take few hits and then have a couple extra infantry units at the ready to attempt a defense somewhere. If things go poorly you can always send these reserve units along with the Tank to W. Russia on non com as reinforcements.

    If the Soviets in W. Russia get hammered (3 or more hits put up by the German defense) then you send both AAguns and all available units to W. Russia. On the other hand, if the Soviets do well in W. Russia (like 2 or less hits put up by the German defense) then you can send these units elsewhere and still feel confident that W. Russia will hold without them.

    This sort of play can often wipe the Germans in W. Russia, and still leave you with extra infantry in range of other places (like Caucasus say if you want to mount a minor defense.) If an Allied bid is allowed, this advantage can increase yet further. Leaving you enough HP and power to get the job done against Germany for the first round, while still proving the W. Allies that added back-up in Szech, on the 2 turn “race around” with the 4th Russian tank. This tank can really come in handy if the British are unable to send fighter support from sz 35 to keep the Chinese flying tiger alive, and it can jet back to the Eastern Front with G the following round, without really missing a beat. 😉

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  • '14

    Ruminating further on the previous post, a question occurs to me now…

    If you don’t want to attack Ukraine on R1, is there any good way to reliably defend Caucasus against an all out G1 attack?

    I don’t see many strong options here, that don’t at the same time give Germany a way to reliably stack Karelia. If you go full force into W. Russia on the opening attack, and then try landing your fighters in Caucasus to mount a full defense of the southern factory runs the risk of inviting a German assault with the transport in sz16 (even at a rather poor exchange, they might do this just to destroy the Red Airforce immediately.) On the other hand if you try to just trade West Russia instead of stacking it, so that you’ll have enough HPs to deter any possibility of a German attack on Caucasus, then this would seem to leave Karelia vulnerable to the G1 stack north. Basically defending the south doesn’t do you a whole lot for the investment, and it doesn’t really mess with Axis warplan. In the process you screw yourself out of the best fighter transits from UK.

    So my suggestion, as highlighted earlier would always be to stack W. Russia, even acknowledging that it is technically possible to go full southern defense if you wanted too, I just think its easier to defend it lightly on R1 and put of the focus on R2 instead 😉


  • 2019 2018 2017 2016

    I’m having trouble seeing why defending Caucasus and preventing a German Karelia stack without attacking Ukraine would even be hard, if that’s what you really want to do.

    Caucasus starts with 3 inf, 1 art, 1 tnk, 1 AAA. Of those units, you really want to bring the artillery north for the attack on West Russia, but you can leave the rest in place, and then reinforce them with the Kazakh infantry, 2 Russian infantry, the Russian AAA, two fighters, and a build of 4 infantry, leaving you with 10 inf, 1 tnk, 2 ftr, 2 AAA in Caucasus. At most, Germany can hit that with 4 inf, 1 art, 3 tnk, 4 ftr, 1 bmbr, 1 BB. My battle calculator shows that as a solid win for Russia.

    Meanwhile, you still have 7 inf, 3 art, 3 tnk, 2 ftr that can attack West Russia on R1. You should expect to lose about 2 inf on that attack, but you can bring 2 infantry to Archangel as reinforcements from Evenki, and build 2 tanks in Russia, leaving you with a force of at least 7 inf, 3 art, 5 tnk, 2 ftr to re-take Karelia on R2. Isn’t that enough?


  • '14

    Its tricky, I think against a very cautious German player that sort of defense might work, but against bloodthirsty numbers cruncher, it invites an immediate German attack.

    Using the scenario outlined above, the risk would be to W. Russia rather than Caucasus. Say for example that you take the expected 2 hits in Western Russia exchange, under the numbers proposed that leaves you with what?

    5 infantry 3 artillery and 3 tanks parked in W. Russia for defense on G1 right?

    If Germany sends all their ground in range (including the units you didn’t destroy in Belo/Ukraine) and a reasonable amount of air, say something like…

    6 inf 1 artillery 4 tanks, 3 fighters and 1 bomber. Germany has a 99% chance to destroy the W. Russia stack with like 7/8 units remaining (basically all their air and armor have a good chance to survive.) Sure they might die on counter if the Russians attack out of Caucasus/Moscow on R2, but that still leaves Germany with 6 infantry and 2 tanks to stack Karelia after the soviets are destroyed in W. Russia.

    Sending the AA to defend in W. Russia can drop this by a few percentage points, but even then G can still crack you.

    If the Soviets still try to attack Karelia on R2, with the 2 inf from Archangel, 2 tanks (purchased at Moscow), with the 2 fighters from Caucasus vs Germany’s 6 infantry and 2 tanks, that is only a 13% chance of victory for the Russians (there 3rd tank would be out of range in Caucasus, since W. Russia is likely to be recaptured. So basically, if G goes balls to the Wall on G1 in response to the Caucasus defense plan, they can crush your Soviet armor and artillery in W. Russia and still stack Karelia and Belo (the ideal landing spot for fighters) for solid G2 positioning on the Eastern Front.

    Caucasus will hold through G1 and likely G2 for sure, but the Russian line against Karelia for R2 counter attack will basically be screwed in the exchange. Its also much harder for UK to transit fighters on UK1 with W. Russia in German hands and arch under threat on G2. I think often its very hard in 1942.2 to gauge how many troops are really required to put up a proper defense in W. Russia vs the all out G1 assault. As the soviets, without running any R1 attacks, to deplete the number of Germans arrayed against you, its really necessary to stack W. Russia much deeper than you might think.

    Russia is in a definite bind. There lack of ground units at the outset, is one of the main reasons why the Allied air wall at the center is so necessary to face down that German crunch, and they’re factories are in terrible locations haha. Its funny to imagine units being produced out of the Caucasus during the middle of the battle of Stalingrad, I think Volograd would have made more sense.

    One interesting alternative to an Allied bid, is allowing the Allies to remove 1 of their factories, as a way to achieve better balance for their side. The obvious choices would be Karelia (perhaps even Caucasus or India for some strategies), getting rid of any of those starting factories can actually help the Allies more than it hurts them, since the factories cannot be used by the Axis unless Axis actually purchase the production. In my HR games I sometimes allow the Allies to move one of their starting factories as a set up change. For example moving the Karelia factory to Volodga for free, just as a set up change before the game begins.


  • 2019 2018 2017 2016

    Thanks for the explanation! That makes a lot of sense. I guess it’s much more important to deny Germany the ability to produce in the Caucasus than it is to keep Russia’s ability to produce in the Caucuses. Russia’s not strapped for build slots – even if you make it up to 30 or 32 IPCs, you can place them all in Russia very comfortably by building, e.g., 1 fighter per turn. Russia wants to produce in Karelia if possible because it’s significantly closer to the front, but the only territory adjacent to Caucasus that isn’t adjacent to Moscow is Ukraine, and Ukraine is adjacent to West Russia – so there’s only one, very narrow situation when you’d have any real need to produce in Caucasus: if you’re short on infantry in West Russia and need to urgently attack the Ukraine. That doesn’t come up much at any time, and I can’t see it ever coming up on R2.

    Now you’ve got me wondering what happens if you attack West Russia with one tank and all available infantry, artillery, and fighters, ignore the Ukraine, and evacuate both Karelia and the Caucasus. I’m thinking that if you’re willing to trade both Karelia and the Caucasus, you could probably spare 2, maybe even 3 tanks to send to Szechuan on R1. You might be able to force Germany to make an inappropriately strong attack on the Caucasus to force you to bring the tanks back west, because otherwise the tanks can hang out in east Asia and slow down Japan by at least a full turn.


  • '14

    That’s actually an idea I toyed with for a while, as a possible way to set up a more effective KJF game. I haven’t quite found one that works in an optimal way for me yet, where G doesn’t stomp, but it somehow seems like something that should be possible.

    Another idea I had for a set up change, back when we were first exploring set-up changes for Russia instead of open bids for the Allies, was to re-orient Russia’s production behind the Urals.

    The Karelia factory moves to Vologda
    And the Caucasus factory moves to Kazakh

    I felt that this more accurately modeled the situation in the real War. Since Leningrad and Stalingrad were contested by Germany, it feels kind of weird that the Russians are forced to defend these front line factories, instead of producing stuff behind the Urals like they did historically. Moving these factories nerfs the Axis production position on the center (improving balance by sides), although it also had the effect of encouraging the JTDTM, since Japan is under a lot more pressure to slam Russia from the rear. The Japanese definitely have a harder time of it though, because Russia can project more power towards the Asian side.
    Basically it tended to move the whole eastern front defensive “line” for the Russians, even further east. Archangel, Evenki and the territories of western China became even more critical.

    I actually thought it worked quite well, though I had a hard time persuading others of its merits, which is why I just started to give the Russians a bomber, since that was easier to explain while adding some excitement. I still really like the factory tweak idea though, over an open bid (which everyone just uses to break the Med, or sz 37.) More fun in my view to give the Russians a better fighting chance, with a more dynamic production spread.
    😄


  • 2019 2018 2017 2016

    Moving the factories east one step is a very interesting idea. The problem with a factory in Vologda is that it’s useless for fighting Germany – it doesn’t border any territories to the west that aren’t bordered by Moscow itself.

    Also, I’m not convinced that putting a Russian factory in Kazakh will make things harder for the Japanese – it could wind up just moving the Japanese’s first captured factory that much closer to the Japanese home islands. As Japan, if I had the chance to capture a factory in Kazakh, I would largely ignore India (holding a loaded transport nearby to keep it honest) and just charge straight for Kazakh. On J1, stack all available units (including units from Tokyo and Philippines via ferry) in Anhwei and Yunnan on J1 and build three tanks and a transport in Tokyo. On J2, converge inf/art in Szechuan on J2 while landing tanks in Yunnan, and build 2 bombers. On J3, attack Kazakh with something like 9 inf, 4 art, 3 tnk, 4 ftr, 3 bmbr. Even if Russia builds 2 inf in Kazakh on R1, R2, R3 and leaves them there, and reinforces with the 4 inf in Evenki, Yakut, and Novosibirsk, and leaves the starting 1 inf in Kazakh, and sends in an AA gun and 2 fighters for extra defense, Russia still only has 11 inf, 2 ftr, 1 AAA – not nearly enough to stand up to the invasion force. Japan takes the territory with 2 inf, 4 art, 3 tnk remaining. Russia could theoretically retake it with all available troop reserves, but then Germany walks into Moscow on turn 5. Basically, Russia has to send massive reinforcements from the western front on turns 1, 2, and 3 to stabilize Kazakh, or it becomes a Japanese factory on turn 3.

    If i were redoing the setup, I would say put the factories in Archangel, Moscow, and the Caucasus, with the Turkish Straits permanently closed to sea traffic, and give Russia a starting cruiser, destroyer, and transport in the White Sea instead of a submarine. This sets up a fun ferrying competition, where the Germans can hold the Baltic and ferry to Karelia, while the Russians hold the White Sea and ferry with bombardment from Archangel right back into Karelia.

    A factory in Archangel helps the Russians reinforce China/Evenki as needed and is more likely to stay under Russian control. A factory in the Caucasus, with the Turkish straits closed, can now be protected affordably, and maintains a credible southern option against Germany.

    I do agree with you about both the history and the excitement, though – better to move factories than to break the Med or SZ 37, and much of Russian production was behind the Urals by 1942. I’m really not even sure what the SZ 37 battle is supposed to symbolize – I’m not aware of the Japanese leaving their capital ships unescorted anywhere near that place or time in history, and if I recall correctly, the main reason why the Japanese couldn’t project naval influence further west toward India and Madagascar was problems of fuel, logistics, and resupply: they just couldn’t get enough oii to steam that far west! I never heard that the Australian and British Indian Ocean navies were in danger of linking up for a joint attack.


  • '14

    It’s true, the two minor factories still serve as a Russian Achilles heal, and like you, when I tested it, Japan gunned for Kazakh (which is my usual 1942.2 attack route for Japan anyway), but the advantage for Russia is that it stretches the German logistics. So Russia can trade with less fear of G immediately stacking the captured factories. Kazakh is kind of interesting too because Indian tanks can reach it in 1 move, and bombers from UK can likewise reach it in 1 move. It’s also possible for the Soviets to put more pressure on Japan in the first round, since Russian tanks built here can reach Kwang on the blitz, while still covering W. Russia or Ukraine. This advantage diminished with each round that elapses, since Japan can shuck so easy, but it might be fun for teasing out new round 1 plays vs Japan. The Kazakh factory is also a permanent blocker, which can come in handy if getting pressed by Japanese tanks and you need to do a full evac.

    It took me a while to realize how important Kazakh is to the Russian position at the center in 1942.2, (the China design is different from earlier A&A boards where this territory, while important, was somewhat less critical in Classic or Revised.) Often in 1942.2 I’ve seen the Russian player let Japan snag it uncontested, which invariably causes the center to fold faster than it might otherwise. The sz61 push to Yunnan allows the Japanese to reach Kazakh very quickly with reinforcements from the home island, and a Japanese held Kazakh is usually in range of German air too, which means that sometimes the Allied player gets tripped up here. They will pull out of Kazakh thinking they can trade the territory with ease, only to get caught with their pants down and lose it permanently to Axis, with no real chance of recovery, as Japan just keeps funneling ground there each round. Here the proposed starting factory draws a big red bulls eye on the territory, making it pretty clear to both sides, that this territory should not be given up without a fight.
    😄

    Also, by removing the Caucasus factory, you really alter the German player’s priorities at the center of the gameboard. They can still park units in Caucasus or Karelia to threaten the center, but they can’t reinforce that stack as easily, which makes the move somewhat less attractive. I rather envision that the trading which occurs in Caucasus and Karelia between G and Russia, is like the Siege of Leningrad or the battle of Stalingrad, with control shifting back and forth, ownership representing when one side or the other has gained the upper hand, but without allowing for immediate spams of infantry. Instead ground has to be moved into the city first haha.

    Vologda is less useful, of course, but it can help to control the north vs an Axis link up, and gives you a but more reach into the Soviet Far east. Its hard to justify building units here at the outset, but this factory is 1 space closer to Japan, so perhaps useful in a KJF type scenario where you want to hold the north against an early blast, or rush some defenders towards the far East, so you don’t have to watch all that red land turn yellow with no contest.

    Archangel is an interesting alternative candidate. It’s only worth 1 ipc on this map, which would be somewhat limiting for Russia, though also limiting for Axis when captured, and it would be a permanent blocker. I like the concept of 1 ipc factories, though I get the impression others might feel that 1 ipc is too low for a starting factory on this board.

    Kazakh and Vologda aren’t quite perfect, but I find that the Russians can be pretty effective out of Moscow, if they don’t have to worry as much about Germany stacking Caucasus with a free factory. Now if G wants to build out of Karelia or Caucasus they’d have to spend 15 ipcs first and face a one round delay, which can make a big difference at about round 6 or 7 when Axis can usually stack the south with ease. Less pressure for UK in India, can also help free up British units to cover Suez or the Russian capital, if Japan goes balls out against China.

    I agree with you about sz37, the set up there is a bit odd. I suppose there is nothing to prevent you from giving the Russians the extra bomber too, in addition to the factory change, if it seems like the Soviets are still too weak.
     😄

    I posted the factory change idea with a gamesave in the HR section, in case anyone wants to try it.
    http://www.axisandallies.org/forums/index.php?topic=36172.0

    Part of the reason I like this tweak, is because it encourages to the Russian player to actually fight against Japan, instead of just ceding control of the East as soon as Japan arrives. Kazakh is not quite as hard to stack/hold as might seem to be the case at the outset. After a few rounds of building, even Evenki and Yakut can hold, provided you’re willing to trade a bit against Japan early on. I think the issue OOB is that Russia is under huge pressure to stay fixated on Karelia and Caucasus for fear of early German stacking, which means they have basically no free units/opportunities to send against Japan. The challenge I think, under the set up I proposed, is that the lack of a starting Factory in Caucasus (no permanent blocker there) changes the way the Allies can “can-open” at the center. You have to be more on guard against a potential Axis blitz route, and remember to leave a blocking unit if you pull out of the territory as Russia, since the factory is not their to serve this function.

    I think there are some other potential factories tweaks you could make too, if you don’t like the Vologda/Kazakh idea.

    One solution might be to move the starting factory in Karelia to W. Russia (German occupied at the outset, but easy for the Soviets to recover on R1) and just keep the Caucasus factory in place. This does the double duty, of denying Germany their easy Lendingrad factory capture, while giving the Russians +2 production in a critical space. The danger there is of Germany taking and stacking W. Russia right next to Moscow, but that just means that the factory can still serve as a swing territory available to either side over the course of play.

    Another idea suggest above is to move the Karelia factory to safe territory that is only worth 1 ipc, to make it less valuable as a target. Arch, Evenki, or Novos could be interesting.

    This stuff is of course all just musing on bid alternatives, and not necessary for beginners. But I think its fun to have some suggestions for different ideas to try, when the game gets a bit old, and you want to attempt something new on your 1942.2 board.

    My favorite tweak is probably still just the Russian bomber at Moscow, if you need a quick fix. I like how the sculpt is so damned huge!

    Also, it’s not inconceivable, that, when provided with an extra bomber from the outset, the Russian player might even get to point where they decide “Well, ����-it! I’m just going to buy second big bomber!” Drop 12 ipcs just the one time, to unleash the dread Red Air armada haha! A pair of fighters, and pair of bombers! The double duo in the skies! A death defying dual with Germany in the light trading game. Plus you get some extra reach on the air evac, in case Stalin has to fly away during the endgame heheh.
    😄


  • Moderator

    This thread is a good read.  😄

    I think Wrus + Belo might need some more detail. I think it was mentioned, but I think it may be the best Russian opening in terms of defending Kar. I’m not a huge fan of the Ukr attack anyway, dating back to Revised - lol, but if your intent is to try and keep Germany out of Kar (at least not holding it), all the Ukr attack does is drain 3 inf and probably 1 rt from threatening Kar on Russia 2. Even if the strafe goes well the rt has to retreat to Cauc. BUT with the belo attack you can attack with 3 inf, 2 ftrs and not only are you eliminating 3 German inf they could go to Kar, but your inf are in position strike Kar (whereas in Ukr they would not). You can get away with an inf or rt buy on R1, b/c with every thing else going to Wrus, Ger should not be able to stack Kar on G1.

    The Attacks:
    Belo - 3 inf, 2 ftrs
    Wrus - 9 inf, 3 rt, 4 arm

    Place 7-8 units in Mos
    You leave Kar and Cauc empty.

    Which brings me to:

    @Black_Elk:

    Another Russian opener, which has not yet been properly considered in this thread. The tricky Tank on Non Com! haha
    😄

    I love it!  😄
    I’ve been doing the Inf, but I’ll definitely try this b/c it is perfect with this open, since you can take Wrus with 9 inf, 3 rt, 3 arm.

    Now you can move the novo/kaz inf to Mos. From here they can go to Wrus on R2 or more likely you can use 1 inf + 3-4 tanks to retake Cauc. 1 inf if Ger moves in only 1 inf, or 2 inf if Ger moves in 2 inf.

    Now you’ll also have to take Ukr, but Germany likely left ony 1 inf there. So typical Round two attacks for Russia will be:

    Kar - 2 inf (arch), 1 ftr if ger left 1 inf (add 1 inf from Wrus if Ger brought in 2 inf)
    Ukr - 2 inf, 1 ftr
    Cauc - 1 inf, 3 arm (2 wrus and the 1 arm from Sze)

    Belo - is optional here in round two because you don’t want to bleed off too many inf or an rt from Wrus that can threaten Kar on R3. But if you do want to do it and you are bringing in an rt, make sure you use the rt in Belo and not Ukr. You want to make sure at the very least the rt is in range of Kar. But you don’t want to bring in more than 2-3 units so you might have forget Belo if it means another rd of deadzone for Kar.

    Now the big thing are the purchases. In rd 1, I like 8 inf. It’s not sexy but it turns out 4 inf, 3 rt only help marginally in preventing a G3 stack. You are running too close to 1:1 inf:rt ratio which doesn’t help once you get the the second rd of combat, but the extra inf fodder allows your 3 rt a full two rounds. But either purchase will work fine, so you can’t really go wrong there. But round 2 is the key purchase and also why I like the 8 inf in rd 1. You should have 28 ipc so here’s where you drop your armor. depending on trading during rd 1 and 2 you may be able to get away with 7 inf, 1 arm save 1 (you fill your 8 placement spots) but you can also go 5 inf, 2 arm, or 3 inf, 3 arm depending on what you need to threaten Kar with.

    I should add you’ll probably need to be able to kill the G trn in rd 1 with the UK or on Russia 2 with the sub. The numbers can get dicey if Ger can transport another 2 units to Kar on G2. At that point it really depends on how many inf your Russia 1 belo units killed in defense or how many inf Germany lost on the front lines reclaiming.

    Anyway, I wanted to bring this up b/c the Tank non-com works perfect with this open since you have to retake Cauc anyway and the tanks move two so you still keep max pressure on Kar even if you have 3-4 arm in Cauc at the end of Russia 2.  😄


  • 2019 2018 2017 2016

    Love it! I’m going to try this next game. Very excited to have a ‘fresh’ Russian opening that works with OOB rules.


  • Moderator

    I forgot to mention.  You’ll have to watch the German Med BB, assuming it will be alive on G2.  You might have to make sure Russia has 2 inf in Cauc at the end on round 2.  I guess it depends on how many German planes are in range.  So instead of having say 1 inf, 3 arm.  You might have to make sure you have 2 inf, 3 arm, maybe even bring in one aa-gun.

    It might also be a case where if UK has the opportunity to clear Cauc for you on UK 1 with 1 inf, 1 bom (maybe a ftr as well if nothing better to do) you’d want them to do it.  Then you just have to worry about the minimum defense there with Russia preserving as much Russian inf as possible.

    Since most players will park 4 ftrs in Fra with Germany on G1, you probably only have to worry about a sneak attack of 1 inf, 1 rt (or arm), 1 ftr, 1 bom, 1 bb.  So you might need 2-3 inf for fodder if you are going to put 3 tanks there.  But if UK reclaims for you, then you can just keep all your units in Wrus.  Just watch the numbers if Germany bought a ftr or bom on G1.



  • Would a sub trolling move be a good idea on R1?

    In this, the Russian sub moves to SZ6 to bottleneck the German subs and cruiser from attacking the British battleship for a round, giving the British some time to maneuver their battleship and transport out of harms way and possibly reinforce them with a destroyer or something else.



  • Also, what would be a good opener against a German tank spam? (sorry if this is a noobish question)
    Specifically, the Germans buy only tanks for the first 3 rounds, and make an immediate push for Moscow. On turn 1, they move all units from Norway to Finland, from Poland to Belorussia, and infantry from Germany to Baltic states. They buy 6 tanks. On turn 2, they hit Karelia with everything possible except 2 or 3 fighters. Then, they move from Karelia to Archangel and from archangel to Moscow in the subsequent two turns (all the while buying 6 tanks and moving them to the massive tank army).

    When I play A&A, the German player (whether me or someone else) always does that with little variation, and it always ends up with Moscow on its knees at G4. I’m just wondering if there’s some Russian opener to stop or at least hinder it.


  • '14

    To the first question, submarines and transports no longer create a hostile sea zone in A&A games since the 50th Anniversary Edition. This means that such a move is not possible in 1942.2, since subs can’t block. The German subs and cruiser can ignore the Russian sub in sz6, passing through it to attack sz7, since the sub doesn’t make sz6 “hostile.” This can be a tricky concept to get your head around if coming to 1942.2 from Classic or Revised, since in those games all naval units create a hostile sea zone. Basically the only way for the Russians to bottleneck sz6 is to bid a destroyer in sz 4 and them move it to block.

    To counter a tank spam you need to put pressure on Berlin with the western Allies. Buy max hitpoints with Russia and then use British and American air to prop up the Russian capital. The USA should also build a fleet ASAP and work to set up in Europe as quickly as possible, Germany will be vulnerable to amphibious landings by UK.

    It’s possible, if the people in your group are used to Revised A&A tank drives, that they are trying to set something up from G1 (since that play was workable in Revised when tanks cost 5 ipcs)
    In 1942.2 this opener leaves Germany fodder poor, and lacking the necessary hitpoints to overcome the W. Russia/Moscow air wall.

    Here this thread might he helpful too… http://www.axisandallies.org/forums/index.php?topic=35768.0
    It describes another move I like to get the air wall up and running.

    There’s some info about the new cost structure for 1942.2 armor in this thread… PrivatePanic helped edit a doc that should make the armor section of that guide easier to locate. Basically tucked in there is a discussion of how to use inf/art in conjunction with air to “deadzone” territory and trade cheaper units for enemy tanks over the course of the game.
    http://www.axisandallies.org/forums/index.php?topic=35703.0

    Also, cool ideas up there Darth! Glad to see others contributing to this thread and keeping the Russian strategy guide active with more feedback


  • '14

    Something I forgot to mention at the outset, but which is fairly important sometimes… if you are attacking Ukraine, it’s better to run the attack in West Russia first. This is because, if you get the chance to strafe Ukraine, it’s good to know how many infantry survived in West Russia. Occasionally Germany will clap hard on you with their defense, in which case taking Ukraine can be more advantageous than strafing it. Either way you are committed to both attacks, but if you run Ukraine first instead of W. Russia, it can sometimes come back to haunt you, even with a brilliant strafe, if you get hammered in W. Russia and allow the Germans a blitz path from Poland and Romania to W. Russia via Ukraine.


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