Japanese Invasion of America?



  • So a friend and I had a argument today over whether or not the Japanese would have been able to pull off a succesful invasion of the Western United States. I told him no and here where my reasons why. First off Japan would have to have secured Midway Island, and the Hawaiian Island to act as a “stopping point” for supplies if they ever landed an invasion force. This task onto itself would have required MAJOR naval, air, and ground conflict. In my opinion the entire Pacific US fleet would have to have been sunk to accomplish this. Second and this goes with the first Japan would have needed to sink all or most of our carriers. My third argument was due to the vast distance from Japan to the Western US the Japanese would at BEST occupy pockets along the West coast and major cities such as San Francisco or Los Angles. Are my arguments valid? or could the Japanese have push us all the way to Washington DC?

    P.S. Would the Japanese ever have considered invading Canada?


  • '12

    The allies took 3 years of building up in England for D-Day.  They had to cross about 20-30 miles of ocean, not 4000-5000 miles.  Germany was a bit tied up with 10 million angry russian soldiers breathing down their neck, no such distractions existed in the Americas.  The landing was in France which was as much as the French are….a friendly if not allied nation albeit under occupation.  The D-Day landing was a surprise to the Germans in that they didn’t know what day or even week it was going to occur.  The Japs would have been seen weeks ahead, their progress followed by the hour.  US subs were VERY effective in the Pacific for both intelligence and attack.  So with a million % advantage over a Jap invasion, the allies were lucky D-Day was not a disaster.  It’s pretty much absurd

    As for Canada, they would have to march 3000 miles inland before they affected Canada’s heavy industry and ability to fight the war.

    They could manage a few islands off Alaska, how’d that work for 'em!


  • 2017 '16 '15 Organizer '14 Customizer '13 '12 '11 '10

    Japan could do it but it would take about 50 years to prepare for that.

    All they can do is sink a large ocean liner in the panama canal and take Hawaii. Anything else would be suicide. They can’t even beat China and they were a 5th rate nation in 1940.



  • @MrMalachiCrunch:

    The allies took 3 years of building up in England for D-Day.  They had to cross about 20-30 miles of ocean, not 4000-5000 miles.  Germany was a bit tied up with 10 million angry russian soldiers breathing down their neck, no such distractions existed in the Americas.  The landing was in France which was as much as the French are….a friendly if not allied nation albeit under occupation.  The D-Day landing was a surprise to the Germans in that they didn’t know what day or even week it was going to occur.  The Japs would have been seen weeks ahead, their progress followed by the hour.  US subs were VERY effective in the Pacific for both intelligence and attack.  So with a million % advantage over a Jap invasion, the allies were lucky D-Day was not a disaster.  It’s pretty much absurd

    As for Canada, they would have to march 3000 miles inland before they affected Canada’s heavy industry and ability to fight the war.

    They could manage a few islands off Alaska, how’d that work for 'em!

    @Imperious:

    Japan could do it but it would take about 50 years to prepare for that.

    All they can do is sink a large ocean liner in the panama canal and take Hawaii. Anything else would be suicide. They can’t even beat China and they were a 5th rate nation in 1940.

    Pretty much what I was thinking and ya logistics would have been a nightmare.


  • 2017 '16 '15 Organizer '14 Customizer '13 '12 '11 '10

    ‘Logistics’ for Japan are Bicycles and Sandals. They totally lacked in mechanization and modern warfare on land. They basically ‘played’ to the level of their opposition, which was primarily backward low level nations substituting Bushido bravery for a proper military doctrine.



  • Japan could land small bands of men on the U.S coast by submarine, but that would be the limit to a sucessful operation on the West Coast.



  • @Imperious:

    Japan could do it but it would take about 50 years to prepare for that.

    50 years of making babies! 😄


  • 2017 '16 '15 Organizer '14 Customizer '13 '12 '11 '10

    More like Germany possibly winning against Russia and England and after occupation of Europe and Africa for 40 years and consolidation, sending an invasion force to California protected by Japanese navy.


  • '12

    The average American citizen is better armed than the average Jap soldier then and most nations soldiers now.  Most armed Americans I know are set up to keep their own government in check, I would imagine they would have given the Japanese army a heck of a fight for every square inch.

    Even if the entire world had fallen to the Axis save the Americas, no invasion could occur for 100 years, long long after the advent of nukes which would have rendered a nuclear stalemate as we had with the Russians.

    The Japs nor Nazis ever contemplated an invasion of the US, probably because it just couldn’t be done, period.


  • 2020 2019 2018 2017 '16 '15 '14 Customizer '13 '12 '11 '10

    Another thing to remember is that the campaigns launched by Japan in December 1941 in Southeast Asia, the DEI, the Philippines, New Guinea and the Central Pacific were carried out by the relatively small forces the Japanese were able to scrape together for that purpose, since a large part of Japan’s military manpower was tied up in China at the time. Adding the conquest of the continental U.S. to the list of territories that these small forces had to occupy would simply not have been credible.  Note that the Japanese forces allocated to the southwest Pacific never even managed to fully secure New Guinea or the Solomons, which were very small and very close to Japan compared to the U.S. and thus were much easier targets.



  • Several people have made some solid points in this thread. I’ll give my own summary of why a Japanese invasion was not a real possibility. (While acknowledging that some of the below points have been made already.)

    Problem 1: Japan had fewer people than the U.S., which puts a lower ceiling on its army size than on America’s army.

    Problem 2: the Japanese Army was significantly less modern and less well-equipped than the American Army. During WWII, Japan produced less than 3,000 tanks, compared to 88,000 tanks for the United States. Compounding that problem was that Japan’s tanks were mostly obsolete light tanks which could not penetrate the armor of Shermans. The U.S. produced 257,000 artillery pieces during WWII, compared to just 13,000 for Japan. America’s artillery were better than Japan’s, especially after the U.S. started using proximity fused shells. The U.S. produced 325,000 military aircraft during WWII, compared to 76,000 for Japan. Later in the war, the U.S. began enjoying a qualitative advantage in that area as well.

    Problem 3: Japan’s army used worse tactics than the American Army (as alluded to by Imperious Leader). U.S. infantry were about 80% as combat-effective as their German counterparts, making the U.S. Army one of the best in the world. (The British were 50% as effective as the Germans, the Soviets about 33% as effective, and the Italians were less effective than the Soviets.) In battles between Japanese and American soldiers, the U.S. generally achieved a 2:1 - 4:1 exchange ratio, with the ratio going in the U.S.'s favor. In the battle of Guadalcanal, Japan repeatedly threw waves of its infantry into the teeth of American machine gun defenses. Major Western nations had learned not to do this during WWI.

    Problem 4: Japan’s army was tied down by a large number of other commitments. CWO Marc mentioned that a large portion of the Japanese Army was preoccupied by its bloody and unwinnable war in China. In addition, the Japanese had to maintain a large force in Manchuria to guard against a Soviet invasion. They also had to garrison the various islands and Southeast Asian land territory they had conquered, and protect that territory against British forces in India and Australia.

    Problem 5: (which you alluded to). A successful invasion would have required near-complete Japanese naval supremacy in the Pacific. That supremacy would have been increasingly difficult to attain as the war went on, due to America’s faster rate of naval production than Japan.

    Problem 6 (which Malachi Crunch pointed out). The D-Day invasion was very difficult for the Allies even though they only had to cross 30 miles of ocean. Japan would have had to cross a much larger distance. Its productive capacity was much less than that of the U.S., so building up the needed invasion fleet + transport capacity would have been difficult or impossible.

    Problem 7 (pointed out by Imperious Leader). Once the invasion force had arrived, supplying it would have been very difficult or impossible; especially after it had begun making significant inland penetration. The supply line (which I assume would stretch all the way back to Japan) would be insanely long. Japan’s industrial capacity was wholly inadequate to provide the naval transports and military trucks required to make that supply line work.

    It’s impossible for me to imagine the Japanese overcoming these problems and successfully invading the United States.


  • '10

    Japan had no incentive to taking over North America.  They just wanted the Westerners out of the Pacific and Asia.

    In fact, they wanted to remain at peace with the United States as a trading partner.  Japanese Exports to the United States were very large and growing before the 1940s (Like Chinese Manufacturing today).  It was almost a JOKE of the time in the pre-war years that almost everything was being “Made in Japan”.


  • 2020 2019 2018 2017 '16 '15 '14 Customizer '13 '12 '11 '10

    @FieldMarshalGames:

    I can’t recall who told me this story, but sometime after WWII a veteran was visiting Arlington National Cemetary and admiring the Marine Corps War Memorial – the big bronze statue modeled on the famous photo of the flag-raising on Mount Suribachi.  A vendor was selling miniature replicas of the statue, one of which he bought.  What did he find written under the base?  “Made in Japan.”


  • 2020 2019 2018 2017

    @FieldMarshalGames:

    It was almost a JOKE of the time in the pre-war years that almost everything was being “Made in Japan”.

    Are you sure about that? As far as I know, the surge of products “Made in Japan” on the western markets, was a post-war phenomenon. A quick search brings up the following information:
    “From 1932 until 1940, for the first time, U.S. exports to Japan exceeded imports from Japan” and “Since 1965, Japan has had a trade surplus with the United States.” (from http://salempress.com/Store/samples/american_business/american_business_japanese.htm)
    and also:
    “The US Customs Bureau in the 1940s stated that items manufactured or produced in Japan should be properly marked to indicate their origin with one of the following tags: “Japan”, “Made In Japan”, “Occupied Japan”, or “Made In Occupied Japan”” (from http://knol.google.com/k/gary-greco/made-in-japan/br6tphsp0a9s/2#).

    So if Japan had a trade deficit with the US between 1932 and 1965, and the label “Made in Japan” itself was only introduced in the 1940’s, it seems unlikely that such products were very common on the US market in the pre-war years.



  • Could Japan have invaded Noth America? probably, but only under the right circumstances.

    If Japan were to make the invasion of the US a major objective, and use forces drawn from China, Manchuria and scale down their invasions of the territories they historically did, they might have the manpower to do it. The pre-war US army was made up of a few WW1 vets and raw green recuits as opposed to the veteran, and much burtalized, Japanese army of that time. The US army at the very out break of the war was 17th in the world in terms of size with only around 174,000 regulars and 200,000 in the national guard. This force was deployed regionaly across the massive continental US with a large number of the reuglars being used in places like the Philippines.

    The pre-war US army had none of the technical advantages it would have by the mid-stages of the war, such as proximity fuses and superior aircraft. Most of the artillery in service with the US at the out-break of the war was inter-war 1920’s models and WW1 hold overs.  In fact when the Second World war opened most US troops were armed with the bolt action Springfield '03 as opposed the iconic M1 Garand that came to replace it. The US was also woefully under equipped in terms of tanks and mechanized transport. So in terms of equipment between the 2 armies the Japanese and US forces are near even, with Japan possessing the experiance edge, while the US had the logistical edge

    (I will finnish as soon as I get home from work!!!)


  • '12

    The US was full of personal trucks and cars, the continent had a huge railroad network.  Private citizens possessed more firearms than the entire of Japan and its armed forces.  No, its just silly to imagine a Japanese navy delivering an invasion force.



  • @Clyde85:

    Could Japan have invaded Noth America? probably, but only under the right circumstances.

    If Japan were to make the invasion of the US a major objective, and use forces drawn from China, Manchuria and scale down their invasions of the territories they historically did, they might have the manpower to do it. The pre-war US army was made up of a few WW1 vets and raw green recuits as opposed to the veteran, and much burtalized, Japanese army of that time. The US army at the very out break of the war was 17th in the world in terms of size with only around 174,000 regulars and 200,000 in the national guard. This force was deployed regionaly across the massive continental US with a large number of the reuglars being used in places like the Philippines.

    The pre-war US army had none of the technical advantages it would have by the mid-stages of the war, such as proximity fuses and superior aircraft. Most of the artillery in service with the US at the out-break of the war was inter-war 1920’s models and WW1 hold overs.  In fact when the Second World war opened most US troops were armed with the bolt action Springfield '03 as opposed the iconic M1 Garand that came to replace it. The US was also woefully under equipped in terms of tanks and mechanized transport. So in terms of equipment between the 2 armies the Japanese and US forces are near even, with Japan possessing the experiance edge, while the US had the logistical edge

    (I will finnish as soon as I get home from work!!!)

    Even while technically neutral, the U.S. was gradually entering wartime mode on several levels. 1) It was militarizing its economy and economic output. 2) Its rules of engagement were becoming increasingly belligerent, especially in the North Atlantic, 3) It had begun formulating joint war aims with the other Allies, and 4) It had adopted a broad series of measures intended to provoke a Japanese attack.

    The U.S. was still technically at peace until December of 1941. In 1940, the U.S. produced 6,000 military aircraft, compared to 5,000 for Japan, 10,000 for Germany, and 15,000 for the U.K. In 1941–while still at peace–American military aircraft production jumped to 19,000 per year. This was more than the entire Axis!

    It experienced a similar increase in its rate of production of tanks. In 1940, the U.S. produced 359 light tanks and only six medium tanks. In 1941, it produced 2,600 light tanks and 1,400 medium tanks.

    Given that Japan did not attack Pearl Harbor until December of 1941, it could not realistically have invaded the U.S. until sometime in 1942. America experienced another dramatic jump in its military production between '41 and '42. It produced 48,000 military aircraft in '42, as opposed to the 19,000 it had made in '41. Japanese military aircraft production for '42 was less than 9,000. The U.S. produced 11,000 light tanks and 16,000 medium tanks in '42. Japan produced just 2,500 tanks and armored fighting vehicles during the entire war!

    You are correct to assert that the U.S. would have been most vulnerable to invasion early in the war. However, Japan lacked the transport or logistic capacity necessary to exploit that window of opportunity. Moreover, that window closed very quickly–had begun closing long before the Pearl Harbor attack had been launched.



  • @FieldMarshalGames:

    Japan had no incentive to taking over North America.  They just wanted the Westerners out of the Pacific and Asia.

    In fact, they wanted to remain at peace with the United States as a trading partner.  Japanese Exports to the United States were very large and growing before the 1940s (Like Chinese Manufacturing today).  It was almost a JOKE of the time in the pre-war years that almost everything was being “Made in Japan”.

    Why did Japan choose to attack them then, why didn’t they wait until Britain was completely killed in Asia?


  • 2020 2019 2018 2017

    I found their invasion plan:


  • '12

    Hey Dylan.  It went like this.  Japan was being VERY brutal in China in the late 30s and early 40s, google ‘rape of nanking’.  Believe it or not, the US produced I believe the majority of the worlds oil at the time.  So, the US cut of the oil to Japan about 6 months before Pearl I think.  Japan knew without oil they were doomed.  So, the hope was, hit Pearl to buy time, take over the pacific rim around Japan including the dutch east indies to get the oil they required.  They figured they could get it all done and then come to peace terms with the US, you stay on your side, we on our side.  Yamamoto knew the US psyche and knew Pearl would only stir up a hornets nest but like a good soldier/sailer he took his orders and did his best.



  • Perhapse I jumped the gun in comparing the 2 opposing forces in this speculative scenario, perhapse I should have better established the parameters of this speculative scenario first. So let me describe the conditions that would have to have been met to allow these to combatants to come face to face on the North American continent.

    Early when planning the war against America admiral Yamamoto hatched upon an idea; rather then just sink the US pacific in the harbor, why not remove the entire facility from American use. He wasnt talking about just destroying the facility itself, but removing all the ships, equipment, supplies, tools and personel from American control. Yamamoto and his staff we planning on a massive air attack on Pearl Harbor, but would then, after a feined retreat, follow up with the comboined fleet bombarding the island and invading Oahu itself. With the forces Japan ear marked to capture the south-eastern pacific territories used here instead Japan could be certian of victory. The Imperial armys high command disliked Yamamoto( and the naval staff in general) and refused to support the plan so it was abandoned. For the sake of this scenario lets say they hadnt and Japans opening strike on America included this plan to.
        So on the morning of Dec. 7th the Japanese combined fleet sits in the waters off of Hawaii and launch their strikes against Pearl Harbor, only this time nagumo is forced to launch the thrid strike and dose even more damage to the port, repair facilities, subs and their bases and finish off the Hawaian air forces, all while taking relatively light casualties. US forces on the island, stunned by the damage and ferocity of the attack attempt to take stock and make repairs and slavage what they can. Meanwhile, in the waters north of Hawaii 2 of the remaining US carries, Lexington and Enterprise are steaming back to Pearl to help with the salvage and rescue operations. Along the way they encounter and shoot down a Japanese sea-plane unable to tell if it radioed the combined fleet. Remaining on full alert the answer is given when several Japanese begin attack runs on the carriers. Despite a heroic stand the 2 carriers are no match for the combined might the first air fleet and are sunk. This leaves the US with one aircraft carrier(USS Saratoga) in the Pacific to Japans 6. The Japanese then return to Oahu and launch their invasion quickly over running the island garrison. The Japanese then set about taking the entire Pacific navys staff prisoner as well as taking precious inteligence information home. Most notable would be the discovery of station HYPO and that their coded messages had been cracked. Japanese combat engineers set about destroy what is left on Oahu that could be of use to the Americans setting the entire port, naval facility, air fields and hangers and radar stations to explode. 48 hours, the Japanese leave, detonating their carefully and stratigic placed explosives and render the island useless as a staging base of the US. This scorched earth policy renders Oahu scarred husk of the tropical paradise it once was. The Japanese also take home a number of high profile prisoners like Admiral Stark and Kimmel (commanders of the pre-war fleet) and the crypto-analists of station HYPO. The loss of these men is very demoralising and leave America in the dark as to what Japans next move will be.

    (I will conclude this soon, just need more time)



  • @FieldMarshalGames:

    Japan had no incentive to taking over North America.  They just wanted the Westerners out of the Pacific and Asia.

    In fact, they wanted to remain at peace with the United States as a trading partner.  Japanese Exports to the United States were very large and growing before the 1940s (Like Chinese Manufacturing today).  It was almost a JOKE of the time in the pre-war years that almost everything was being “Made in Japan”.

    You’ve made an excellent point: Japan did not want war with the U.S. The Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor represented a victory for the FDR administration’s geopolitical strategy, and Germany’s subsequent declaration of war on the U.S. represented a larger victory.

    In the war between Nazism and communism, FDR was strongly on the side of the communists. Unhesitatingly. Wholeheartedly. Without any concerns or regrets whatsoever. The two pillars of his vision for the world’s future were the destruction of Nazi Germany and a long-term alliance between the United States and the Soviet Union. He liked and praised Joseph Stalin, and gaining Stalin’s approval was very important to FDR personally. FDR helped create the pro-Soviet propaganda film Mission to Moscow. But when FDR showed the film to the Soviet dictator, hoping for compliments and praise for having presented communist propaganda to the American people, all he got in return was a grunt.

    FDR’s pro-Soviet and anti-Nazi perspective was the foundation for the U.S.'s entire political and military strategy of the late '30s and early to mid '40s.

    Japan had launched aggression against China in 1937. That war was of secondary or tertiary interest to FDR and his administration, which is why little or nothing was done about it at the time. The equation changed in the spring of 1941 when Germany invaded the Soviet Union. The danger, at least from FDR’s perspective, was that Japan would launch a second invasion from the east. A second front would tie down a portion of the Red Army, and would interfere with FDR’s ability to ship weapons to the Soviets via Vladivostok. Japanese forces would be very strong near the coast due to its powerful battleships and to the fact that the Japanese had a powerful air force in 1941, whereas the Soviets’ air force had been almost completely destroyed by the Germans.

    If, however, Japan were to attack the United States, it would divert Japanese military strength away from the Soviet Union. If the Germans were led to believe that the United States was too weak to fight a two ocean war, Germany might also be tempted to declare war on the U.S. (Especially because doing so would allow Germany to sink the massive quantities of Lend-Lease Aid that FDR was sending to the Soviets and the British.)

    Shortly after Germany invaded the Soviet Union, the FDR administration enacted an oil embargo against Japan. At that point, the Japanese knew that they had less than a year before their oil reserves were exhausted. The most logical source of new oil was, as Malachi Crunch pointed out, the Dutch East Indies. The FDR administration worked to create the impression that, if Japan attacked British or Dutch holdings in the Pacific, the U.S. would declare war. (Whether Congress would have gone to war to protect European colonialism in the Pacific is another matter.) In addition, the FDR administration altered the military’s strategic posture in the Pacific to make it far more threatening to Japan. Strategic bombers were sent to the Philippines–bombers with the range to hit Japanese cities. That base was threatening–but also was something which could be taken out by a surprise attack had the Japanese chosen to launch it.

    The United States had cracked Japan’s diplomatic codes. FDR knew that if he asked for moderate concessions to have the oil embargo lifted, the Japanese would agree. But if he asked for steep concessions, the Japanese would go to war. His administration asked for very steep concessions indeed. The breaking of the diplomatic code also meant that FDR had two weeks of advance notice about the impending Japanese attack. He did not know the exact hour of the attack or its targets, but he knew an attack was coming. The American military was not put on alert, and the military commanders at Pearl Harbor were specifically forbidden from ordering patrol flights. FDR’s administration later scapegoated those in charge of Pearl Harbor, blamed them for the U.S. having been caught by surprise, ended their careers, and publicly humiliated and attacked them with Congressional hearings.

    Two weeks before the Pearl Harbor attack, an important U.S. government document was leaked. This document made it seem as though war between the U.S. and Germany was inevitable and that it was only a matter of time before the U.S. turned its full military strength against Germany. Over the short-term, however, the U.S. was (it was claimed) too weak for a two ocean war, and had an 18 month - 2 year period of vulnerability. After this period of vulnerability had ended, the U.S. would of course make Germany the primary target of its war effort. This document was pivotal in persuading Germany to declare war against the U.S. in the aftermath of the Pearl Harbor attack. The German plan was to defeat the Soviet Union before the U.S. could significantly participate in the European war. Germany would then have the industrial capacity necessary to hold off a D-Day invasion or the destruction of its cities. It would then negotiate an end to hostilities from this position of relative strength.

    Evidence suggests the above-described document was leaked by FDR personally. Its release certainly helped FDR achieve his objective of turning a war against Japan into a war against Germany.

    Shortly after the Pearl Harbor attack, Stalin sent 100 divisions west across the Trans-Siberian railway. They arrived in the middle of winter, and proved to be a complete surprise to the Germans. He was able to do this because the Pearl Harbor attack meant that Japan could no longer launch a major attack on the Soviet Union. In 1942, Americans landed in Algeria, and began fighting the German Army directly. In 1943 Hitler called off his attack against the Soviets at Kursk, in part because he was concerned about an attack the Americans and British had launched in Italy. In addition, Hitler never had the chance to turn Germany’s industrial strength fully against the Soviet Union. A significant portion had to be retained both to build fighters to defend against Anglo-American attacks against German cities, and to continue building up Germany’s industrial capacity to counter increasing levels of American aircraft production.

    WWII succeeded in placing most of Europe under communist domination. That state of affairs bothered Churchill, but did not concern either FDR or Truman. At Yalta, both FDR and Churchill agreed to hand over refugees from the Soviet Union to Stalin, regardless of their consent. Nearly 5 million refugees were affected by this arrangement.


    Tolstoy described the scene of Americans returning to the internment camp after having delivered a shipment of people to the Russians. “The Americans returned to Plattling visibly shamefaced. Before their departure from the rendezvous in the forest, many had seen rows of bodies already hanging from the branches of nearby trees.”[10]


    FDR’s willingness to help the Soviets unjustly imprison or murder millions of innocent men, women, and children represents the natural culmination of his pro-Soviet foreign policy.



  • Kurt, that is a very intresting and insightful post and was a very entertaining read. Seems a bit out of left field though, what’s it got to do with a possible Japanese invasion of the US? Or were you just trying to answer Dylans question? Either way cool read



  • @Clyde85:

    Kurt, that is a very intresting and insightful post and was a very entertaining read. Seems a bit out of left field though, what’s it got to do with a possible Japanese invasion of the US? Or were you just trying to answer Dylans question? Either way cool read

    Thanks for your compliments Clyde. 🙂 In answer to your question, I felt that a discussion of a Japanese invasion of America has two parts: 1) what Japan could do. 2) what Japanese leaders had hoped to achieve back when they’d decided to go to war. My most recent post was more relevant to 2) than to 1).

    I agree that the scenario you’ve outlined earlier is within the realm of possibility. (I’m referring to your post about the potential destruction of most of the U.S. Pacific carrier fleet and the neutralization of the American naval base at Pearl Harbor.) I don’t personally feel this would have opened the door to a potential Japanese invasion of the West Coast, for the reasons I outlined earlier. But I’m happy to read any thoughts you or others may have on the matter.



  • Thank you Kurt  😄 I will attempt to conclude my theroy here.

    The Japanese combined fleet has delt the US a crippling blow in its opening offensive. The entire pre-war fleet (excluding the carrier Saratoga and the cruiser Indianapolis, with a literal handful of destroyers and frigates) has been wiped out with no way to recover any piece of it. Whats worse, Americas forward base in the Pacific, Pearl Harbor, has been completely neutralized. The Japanese now hold the senior commanders and their staffs prisoner along with the startling revalation that their codes have been broken. The have also taken home with them knowladge of Americas new weapon, radar, which is passed over to Japans top sicentists to see what they can learn about it. On its way home, the combined fleet and the S.N.L.F. the took part in the occupation of Oahu, make a brief stop at wake to help finish off what had been a heroic and stalwart defense of the island. Along with this, the Japanese Empire has also taken guam and invaded Hong Kong, Malaya, the Phillipines, Burma, and has sunk the British fleet in the waters of the south China sea. By early 1942 all, save for the north of Burma and, will have fallen to the Japanese empire.
        When departing from their breif occupation Oahu they issued a “scorched earth” directive and let the island a ruined of its ones beautiful self. Thousands lie dead and the surviors tell stories of the horror of the Japanese occupation. The stories that reach the mainland, while afirming the peoples resolve to fight, has an enormously negative effect on the homefronts morale. People begin to wonder aloud whether their goverment and armed forces can protect them. The US high command send 2 more carriers, the Hornet, the_Wasp_, and their escorts to reinforce the Saratoga in the pacific. This nascent carrier force is all that stands between the entire Japanese combined fleet and the west coast of the United States. As such it is kept close to coastal near the newly created west coast command on the Treasure islands off of San Farnsisco.
        The next stage of Japans offensive beging almost immediately after their attack on Pearl Harbor. Taking tips from their German counter parts, the Japanese naval staff organize “wolf-pack” style submarine fleets and set them on raiding all shipping comming from the Western coast of North America. These ookami packs, patrol in an arch from the Aleutian Islands in the north to the Panama canal in the south. The Japanese submarines were some of the best seen during the WW2 ear and had massive range. The Japanese merchant raiding is massively successful as shipping from the west coast is brought to a near halt. Lend Lease equippment intended for Australia, China, India, and the Soviet Union sits on pier unable to get ot their destination. The Carrier force dose all that it can to protect costal shipping but the Joints Chiefs unwillingness to risk Americas last remaining power in the Pacific means that any deep water protecting is impossible. Also the massive expanse the Japanese wolf-packs are operating over is just too wide and the Carrier force (named Task force Halsey in honor of Admiral Halsey who went down with the USS Enterpirse on Dec. 7) can not be everywhere at once.
        A argument breaks out between the joint chiefs and the white house. The joint chiefs want to use the carrier force to protect areas of high strategic value, like the panama canal, and also to try and set the Japanese off balance by striking at the Japanese bases a Truk or other critical areas to Japan. Some more radical elements in the army command even want to try bombing the home islands themselves, an idea being championed by Lt.-col. Doolittle. However the political leadership refuse to allow the carriers to be risked and know that the presence of the carriers on the west coast is the only thing keeping an out right panic from gripping the people there. This impass leaves US Forces in the Pacific and west coast to sit and wait at the mercy of Japan to see what will happen next.

    (Sorry, I know I said I conclude it here, but I will finish it very soon!!!)


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