Favorite post WWII conflict



  • I see the your point Garagntuan. Your saying bascically that non of this should have happened. Its as simple as that. Funny how hard the human mind can think when it comes to something like this. But thats just it. You don’t think. The average person goes on living. They just don’t care. This sounds alot like the Hungary Games series. The main character never knows who to just. The archtypical “bad guys” or the rebels fighting for “a better future”. All this is in human nature. Everyone needs to react in the way they see fit. So as I mentioned in the last post., you just can’t control what happens. There are other powers at work whether you call them Faith, Fortune, or Luck. We just need to decide what to do with what is given to us.


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    In his book “War”, Gwynne Dyer discusses how the wartime alliance of the US and the USSR quickly feel apart once Germany and Japan had been defeated.  He argues that any experienced 18th century diplomat would have had no problem understanding why the US and the USSR ended up at each other’s throats after WWII, even though the concepts of democracy and communism would have been completely alien to him.  The reason why alliances in major wars tend to fall apart after victory is that the winners are the biggest pieces left on the chessboard after the losers have been eliminated, and thus are the biggest potential threats to each other.



  • @CWO:

    In his book “War”, Gwynne Dyer discusses how the wartime alliance of the US and the USSR quickly feel apart once Germany and Japan had been defeated.  He argues that any experienced 18th century diplomat would have had no problem understanding why the US and the USSR ended up at each other’s throats after WWII, even though the concepts of democracy and communism would have been completely alien to him.  The reason why alliances in major wars tend to fall apart after victory is that the winners are the biggest pieces left on the chessboard after the losers have been eliminated, and thus are the biggest potential threats to each other.

    An excellent point. It was all about competion not about communism or democracy. Those were just propaganda used by the countries to make them hate each other. It wasn’t necsarilly (i cant spell) the countries fighting eachother. It was the leaders disliking eachother.



  • @Pvt.Ryan:

    @CWO:

    In his book “War”, Gwynne Dyer discusses how the wartime alliance of the US and the USSR quickly feel apart once Germany and Japan had been defeated.  He argues that any experienced 18th century diplomat would have had no problem understanding why the US and the USSR ended up at each other’s throats after WWII, even though the concepts of democracy and communism would have been completely alien to him.  The reason why alliances in major wars tend to fall apart after victory is that the winners are the biggest pieces left on the chessboard after the losers have been eliminated, and thus are the biggest potential threats to each other.

    An excellent point. It was all about competion not about communism or democracy. Those were just propaganda used by the countries to make them hate each other. It wasn’t necsarilly (i cant spell) the countries fighting eachother. It was the leaders disliking eachother.

    I disagree I think its a lot more complicated than that, there were fundemental differences in the ways they governed their countries and their people’s lives. In the U.S it was largely a policy of non interference and letting people prosper through free market capitalism while in the USSR it was a policy of controlling every single aspect of their people’s daily lives in order to maintain order and obedience from their people.

    @KurtGodel7:

    The American Communist Party took its orders from Moscow. The Soviets realized that the United States was too strong to conquer from the outside, and so sought to promote revolution from the inside. But they also knew the United States was internally much stronger than czarist Russia had been. For the hoped-for revolution to take place, the existing social order first had to be destroyed or severely weakened. That meant the following:

    • Destroying the American family by promoting divorce, radical feminism, and the end of traditional marriage.
    • Destroying traditional morality
    • Destroying religion
    • Destroying race and the existence of race through immigration and through changing attitudes about miscegenation
    • Destroying patriotism

    The American Communist movement was particularly powerful in the '60s. Some of the ideas they attempted (with various success) to insert into the public consciousness included the following:

    • Radical feminism and female hate of men
    • The idea that criminals are heroes and social revolutionaries for opposing the existing (evil) social order
    • The idea that the white race is bad; and that whites should hate their own race

    To varying degrees these ideas influenced mainstream American culture and American law. For example, many in the mainstream adopted a watered-down version of the communists’ view of criminals. Criminals were now portrayed as victims (of poverty, racism, and social injustice) rather than victimizers and a source of social injustice. Anti-crime laws were weakened, the culture became far more tolerant of crime, and (expectedly) the crime rate became much higher in the '60s than it had been in the '50s. Those who were raped and murdered as a result of this crime spree were a distant echo of the hate, rape, and mass murder the Red Army had perpetrated as it moved westward into Germany.

    There is only one appropriate response to the evil of Soviet communism. One must oppose it completely, totally, ruthlessly, and wholeheartedly. There is no moral distinction between the leaders of the communist movement and a man who has broken into your house for the sole purpose of raping and murdering your family. None. The attitudes you have toward that man must also be applied to the communist movement. Any other mindset is far too mild.

    This is one of the most insightful things I have ever had the good fortune to read and it opens up a whole nother school of thought into the downfall/decline of Western civilization, I will be bothering my girlfriend about discussing the implications of these ideas for many weeks and months to come  😄



  • Ha carful dude on that one. And yes there are many factors at play here. To many to count in fact. I don’t think our mere minds really grasp the whole thing. It is one of the things in history though that really makes you think.



  • @Pvt.Ryan:

    Ha carful dude on that one. And yes there are many factors at play here. To many to count in fact. I don’t think our mere minds really grasp the whole thing. It is one of the things in history though that really makes you think.

    I completely agree, its incredibly complex but that only makes it more interesting because every single historical event has so many different causes some of which are impossible to quantify unlike the obvious ones like economic, political and social reasons.



  • My point has been taken  :-D. Yes it makes it very interesting. I guess this is just how the human mind works  🙂



  • @Pvt.Ryan:

    I chose other. I’m all for the War between United Nations Space Command and the Covenent Military. WHAT! you didnt say it had to be real.

    Actually I find the Halo fictional war to be a very very entertaining piece of fiction, at least for me. The space battles described in the books are well detailed even though us humans get our butts handed to us. But hey at least when it comes to the ground war we have the advantage with the spartans  8-). That was of course till Reach fell, and along with it most of the spartan soldiers……Back to reality, Cuban Missile Crisis is first on my list, followed by Covert Ops done by the CIA throughout the second half of the twentieth century, (Too many to name).



  • It is. Specially the games. Killing people as the Chief. AWESOME  :mrgreen:



  • On another, somewhat related topic, does the author of this poll realize that Operation Enduring Freedom is the invasion of Afghanistan? The Iraq conflict was codenamed Operation Iraqi Freedom.



  • The recent Lybian Civil War has been one of the more interresting post WWII conflicts.


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