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Lessons Learned Global 1940


  • Liaison TripleA '11 '10

    For Russia if you have 4 turns before your attacked build units in the correct order(IE men first then tanks not the other way around) because men take longer to reach the front lines.

    Good comment RED

    The same can be said for the Germans.  If you are planning to go heavy Barbarossa,  build your infantry and artillery FIRST.  Mechanized units can come later.  And remember, don’t step off the gas pedal mid game just because the allies are making a little bit of headway in Europe.  Make sure you finish off the Red Beast, so that those troops can come home victors instead of die in the snow as failures.

    It’s easier to clean up the mess in France once Russia is taken completely… than to have no mess in france, but no hope of defeating the Red army, or winning the game.



  • Here is a huge one.  Forgive if this has been mentioned already.  For Russia, DO NOT congregate your Eastern Forces in AMUR on the FIRST turn.  HUGE MISTAKE.  Japan will attack them and you will lose 18 INF and 1 AA gun.



  • I have found early German investment on deterrence against US and UK naval interference in Europe to pay huge dividends as the game moves into its middle stages.  With the G1 CV 2 TRN purchase followed by a minimum of 1 sub every single turn (we’ve taken to calling these insurance or safety subs in our group) and a focus on preserving the Luftwaffe, Germany can have a substantial fleet of subs ready to take hits for Luftwaffe when its inevitably called upon to strike the US and/or rebuilt UK fleets.  Having Italian air ready to blow up any destroyer blocks by the Allies to prevent your sub force from converging on Gibraltar is pretty key.  This will normally result in one of two things happening: either the US will force the issue early intending to sacrifice its fleet in order to whittle down the Luftwaffe, or they will spend an extra handful of turns to make sure that any attack on their invasion fleet would be suicidal.  Either way, the US is forced to spend more points on fleet cover for its transports and less on men, which will allow Germany and Italy more time to push into Russia and more time to prepare adequate defenses in Europe all for the cost of 6-12 IPC’s per turn.



  • My advice is to stick to the script, that is, the script of all the other previous A and A games…

    Germany’s primary target should be Russia (unless England is acting like a total moron and asking for you to invade them).  Russia should build defensive infantry at first to watch the German’s first moves and decide from there whether they will need more defensive inf (Barbarossa) or offensive arm (Sealion).  Japan needs to go after the money islands, take over China, and threaten India if not outright take it, while maintaining naval parity with the US in the Pacific.  The UK should do everything in its power to hold the line against Germany until the US enters the war, but most of all, NOT losing England to an amphibious invasion by G3.  Italy needs to survive, mostly playing the same role as the UK, i.e., NOT being in position to be invaded by the US/UK from Gibraltar without enough defenders to hold the capital from amph. assault by I4.  The US is the one exception, barring really bad Allies team play, you can generally get away with doing anything you want since you are the infinite money god uber Allies superior band aid fix side, plus you don’t really need to worry about taking too many casualties as you can build entirely new stacks of anything every round.  Just think of the US as the hammer pounding the nails into the Axis coffin.

    The more deviations the Axis go from the script, the more spread out your forces get, until the US’s infinite money advantage steps in and lays your guys flat.  If you’re not equalling/exceeding the total money the Allies are getting by Round 6-7, you’re doing something wrong, and its just a matter of time before the economics and a few bad rolls force you to surrender.

    To wit:

    Always be pushing forward with some ultimate objective in mind.  Realize in advance how many units they’ll have by the time you get there, and how many units you’ll need to take it with your own forces by the time you get there.  Plan your builds in advance accordingly.  If some stroke of good or bad luck occurs, don’t panic, just adjust your strategy depending on the situation.  If something comes to a critical juncture, remember that as the attacker you’ll have the advantage in that you have the option to retreat if the dice go bad, whereas the defender is stuck with what he’s got. Sometimes a defeat isn’t really a defeat, if it wears down the utimate objective enough so that another side has a chance of taking it (don’t want to know HOW many times the Japanese finished off the Russians after the initial German push failed in old games).  With that in mind, try to coordinate attacks and defending stacks with your teammates. Italy/Germany work really good together in Russia; by the same token, the UK/US work really good together in France.  Italy/Japan can also try some shenanigans in the Middle East and Africa.  Why make the game harder than it needs to be if two coordinated forces are better than one?

    Always keep your ultimate goal in mind, however, and don’t let victories in other fronts distract you from the ultimate goal.  Sure, its great that Germany is on a roll keeping the US/UK out of the Atlantic for the fourth consecutive turn now, but if the campaign in Russia is stalled out, that’s not what you should be crowing about.  The sooner you accomplish your ultimate goal, the sooner your side gets to winning the game, rather than just prolonging it.


  • Customizer

    Questioneer,

    I might add one additional “Commandment”.

    In (almost) all situations, and all countries,…

    "Thou shall kill any/all enemy Transports"

    as they are what makes war possible.  I believe, that with extremely few exceptions, that Transports are my #1 PRIORITY to attack.  This is especially true for G-1.

    –------------------------------------------

    You know, a lot of inteligent discusion about detailed strategic thought patterns or specific tactics has been enumerated above and I agree with most of it.  But to me, some of it just seems logical and obvious.

    Basically, this game is one of ECONOMICS.  First, in that you are battling to increase your income to a level superior to your enemies’, and Second, in your battles to KILL A LARGER IPC TOTAL than you loose in combat.

    I feel that this game is the LOGICAL counterring of your enemies CAPABILITIES through STRATEGIC thought and TACTICAL movements to surpress your enemies goals and impose your own.

    Yes,…you must:

    Know the Rules and apply them to your benefit.

    Know the Map and know the “choke points” and strategically necessary land/sea zones.

    Be aware of, and make tactical plans to counter all of your enemies’ CAPABILITIES, not just what you think his probable moves would be.

    Be FLEXIBLE in your plans so as to be able to counter any moves by your enemies.

    Play OFFENSIVELY, DEFENSIVELY, STRATEGICALLY, and TACTICALLY all at the SAME TIME.

    This game is NOT about your attacks and their outcome ONLY,…but how you look defensively AFTER that attack.  Can you retain what you’ve taken?  Can you reinforce it?  And does this attack aid your strategic goals?

    LOGIC, and it’s INTELLIGENT application to the game in the form of a cogent strategy is this game in a “nutshell”.  Just remember that and don’t get “caught up” in the combat aspects of the game or “making impressions” on your enemy.

    “Tall Paul”



  • Super fighters range.

    Park 2 german fighters on an italian Carrier.
    Or park 2 anzac fighters on an american Carrier.

    During Italy/USA turn you move your carrier close to the target.
    During Germany/Anzac turn you sink that fleet that your opponent tought was safe with your fighters.

    If you start from a seaport you have at LEAST a range of 5 from your starting position with this trick.


  • 2015 Official Answers '11 '10 Moderator

    Thanks Tall Paul for resurrecting this old thread.

    A lot of great points by Gargantua.  Don’t tell 'em ALL the secrets!  I enjoy winning against opponents who haven’t figured a lot of these things out yet!



  • Know your enemy

    So many times during a game I hear “Dam…. I didn’t see that coming”, or “I didn’t know you could reach me there”. It happens because, players don’t take the time to study their enemy before they move their own units. I compare A&A to Chess all the time, and a good Chess player will always scan the board and determine everything his opponent’s pieces can do to harm his chances of winning. Same thing in A&A, as it only takes 3 to 5 minutes to put yourself in your enemy’s shoes, and ask yourself… "what can my units do, where can my units reach, and how can my units be used best. Once you know where your opponent’s power lies, you can sabotage their ability to wage war effectively, and prepare yourself to do what needs to be done. Many of you may say, “thats just a given, and it goes without saying”… I disagree. Many players are so jacked up on their own strategic juices, and eager to show their enemy their powerful offensive wrath, that they can’t see what’s about to happen to them.

    Tip: Instead of getting all excited and taking his knight with your pawn, you should study the board and realize that, by moving that pawn, you are allowing him to take your queen with his bishop. Take the time, and put yourself in your enemy’s shoes… you will be surprised how often the insight will effect your purchases and movements. Which brings up another point…

    Minimize your mistakes

    Those of us who are highly experienced and play the game well, will still make a blunder that can shift the balance with a single combat move. There is a lot to do in A&A, especially during one on one games (which is the most common format by far). However, I have seen even the most skilled players, playing 1 nation in a 6 player game, make the biggest errors you can imagine, point is…. mistakes are going to happen. You may forget to buy a destroyer which was very important to your campaign, or you may realize that you haven’t been collecting that $5 NO for the past 4 rounds, and maybe you will buy 4 infantry and 2 transports for ANZAC, only to find out that you can only place 3 units. Most of these are newbie mistakes, but no matter how good you are, you will eventually forget to do things that you wanted to do during the course of a game… guaranteed. Some will be minor and unnoticeable, but it only takes one major mistake to prolong victory, or threaten defeat.

    Tip: Don’t be arrogant, you will make mistakes, and once you accept this, the cure is simple… minimize them.



  • A small point, but a psychological one.

    Does anyone face their units in the direction you intent to go?

    Just like having your units grouped non-stacked and “messy”, to slightly confuse your opponent, you could also aim them in random directions to give that messiness a better edge.

    Conversely, you could face your units towards an opponent to stare the enemy down and show determination, seem more threatening.

    Just a thought.


  • Customizer

    Rammstein,

    By the same token, you could have your Infantry(and other units) face into a direction that you are NOT going and have them “fool” the enemy as to your intentions.  This works even better when you add some verbal taunts to the mix.  I’ve seen this work many times, though not as thoroughly with experienced players.

    “Tall Paul”



  • -Don’t let your knowledge or notions of WW2 interfere with the game. A&A is an approximation of WW2. It is not WW2. It’s only now people are realizing Japan is capable of winning if the U.S. player has clearly watched ‘Saving Private Ryan’ one too many times, and does everything to storm Normandy. Also, strat. bombing is far more useful for Germany and Japan than any other nation, contrary to the historical record.

    -There are four different NO categories for Japan, and one of them is BS–a total red herring. Can you spot it?

    -Be bold if you’re the axis. Be patient if you’re the allies.



  • Really interesting post Garg.  Some good points.  I especially agree with point #2.  When I play Germany I usually concede the sea to the allies and there are times when the US has a massive fleet off of Europe with little in the way of loaded transports.  So since I’ve already conceded the water and have consolidated my land defenses all those cruisers and Battleships are just wasted economy.  I would always suggest to build your fleet around your transports.  Just enough to keep them protected….unless of course you’re going after Japan and need to smash their Navy.



  • @Gargantua:

    • DIRTY TIP! when playing face to face.  Don’t chip your units up, leave them in a messy pile on the board.  Move the clump of units around, and no one will know quite whats in there…  I’ve seen this work many a time.

    We’ve had a house rule for over 20 years that you must use chips. Just to prevent this sort of thing.



  • @Tall:

    Rammstein,

    By the same token, you could have your Infantry(and other units) face into a direction that you are NOT going and have them “fool” the enemy as to your intentions.  This works even better when you add some verbal taunts to the mix.  I’ve seen this work many times, though not as thoroughly with experienced players.

    “Tall Paul”

    Been doing this for years.


  • 2016 2015

    Another lesson learned: If you have an opponent with less beer skill,
    then offer him some tasty strong bavarian beer!
    This strategy is called: drunken Axis&Allies and it works! Time will play for you  😄



  • @cyscott1:

    @Gargantua:

    • DIRTY TIP! when playing face to face.  Don’t chip your units up, leave them in a messy pile on the board.  Move the clump of units around, and no one will know quite whats in there…  I’ve seen this work many a time.

    We’ve had a house rule for over 20 years that you must use chips. Just to prevent this sort of thing.

    Yeah, if I don’t like the pile, I will ask that person to chip there units or I will chip it for them.  Good house rule to chip all land units at the very least.



  • @Young:

    Know your enemy

    So many times during a game I hear “Dam…. I didn’t see that coming”, or “I didn’t know you could reach me there”. It happens because, players don’t take the time to study their enemy before they move their own units. I compare A&A to Chess all the time, and a good Chess player will always scan the board and determine everything his opponent’s pieces can do to harm his chances of winning. Same thing in A&A, as it only takes 3 to 5 minutes to put yourself in your enemy’s shoes, and ask yourself… "what can my units do, where can my units reach, and how can my units be used best. Once you know where your opponent’s power lies, you can sabotage their ability to wage war effectively, and prepare yourself to do what needs to be done. Many of you may say, “thats just a given, and it goes without saying”… I disagree. Many players are so jacked up on their own strategic juices, and eager to show their enemy their powerful offensive wrath, that they can’t see what’s about to happen to them.

    Tip: Instead of getting all excited and taking his knight with your pawn, you should study the board and realize that, by moving that pawn, you are allowing him to take your queen with his bishop. Take the time, and put yourself in your enemy’s shoes… you will be surprised how often the insight will effect your purchases and movements. Which brings up another point…

    Minimize your mistakes

    Those of us who are highly experienced and play the game well, will still make a blunder that can shift the balance with a single combat move. There is a lot to do in A&A, especially during one on one games (which is the most common format by far). However, I have seen even the most skilled players, playing 1 nation in a 6 player game, make the biggest errors you can imagine, point is…. mistakes are going to happen. You may forget to buy a destroyer which was very important to your campaign, or you may realize that you haven’t been collecting that $5 NO for the past 4 rounds, and maybe you will buy 4 infantry and 2 transports for ANZAC, only to find out that you can only place 3 units. Most of these are newbie mistakes, but no matter how good you are, you will eventually forget to do things that you wanted to do during the course of a game… guaranteed. Some will be minor and unnoticeable, but it only takes one major mistake to prolong victory, or threaten defeat.

    Tip: Don’t be arrogant, you will make mistakes, and once you accept this, the cure is simple… minimize them.           Â

    Very good post.  I agree wholeheartedly. 😄



  • Grasshopper, I agree as well with the need to minimize mistakes. Especially between two relatively equal opponents, mistakes can mean the difference between a win and a loss. It means that (especially with the online format) you need to take your time and analyze your moves.

    A good example was a game in which I had brought a US Pacific fleet south, raided the DEI, and thinking I was clever, kept going into the Indian Ocean to raid and control the Med. It was a great idea in theory… but I had never taken Italian Somaliland with Britain… so… aircraft that I never counted on were able to use it to get just in range, and destroyed my fleet. From that point on, the game was over.

    I fumbled the ball on the goal line.

    The more I’ve cleaned up my fumbles and interceptions, the more competitive I’ve become. When you play largely mistake free (and have a relatively good grasp of strategy and logistics) you force your opponent to play at the same level.



  • So. To the point, make sure you take Italian Somaliland.  🙂



  • @Stalingradski:

    Grasshopper, I agree as well with the need to minimize mistakes. Especially between two relatively equal opponents, mistakes can mean the difference between a win and a loss. It means that (especially with the online format) you need to take your time and analyze your moves.

    A good example was a game in which I had brought a US Pacific fleet south, raided the DEI, and thinking I was clever, kept going into the Indian Ocean to raid and control the Med. It was a great idea in theory… but I had never taken Italian Somaliland with Britain… so… aircraft that I never counted on were able to use it to get just in range, and destroyed my fleet. From that point on, the game was over.

    I fumbled the ball on the goal line.

    The more I’ve cleaned up my fumbles and interceptions, the more competitive I’ve become. When you play largely mistake free (and have a relatively good grasp of strategy and logistics) you force your opponent to play at the same level.

    It’s OK to make mistakes and learn from them, but I knew someone who never learned from his mistakes, and just chalked up losses as bad luck. It takes mental effort to try and become a better player, and those who think there is no room for improvement, will continue to make the same errors.


  • Customizer

    Well,

    I’m paraphrasing, but the quote goes something like:  “Those who don’t know history are doomed to repeat it’s mistakes”.

    “Tall Paul”


  • 2018

    Enjoying the thread, I have a few things to add:

    1. Don’t be so quick to take hits on your carriers, esp if you are on the defense.  If you don’t have a landing zone with in one move and you take hits on your carriers, the attacker can just retreat and you lose your airforce.  I have done this a couple of times on my unsuspecting Japanese opponents.  I have attacked with my large American navy against their large Japanese navy and after first round of combat Japan took damage on all of their carriers so I then just retreat and they lose all their airforce.  Now America is in a nice defensive position with all of it’s air and navy and japan only has surface ships and damaged aircraft carriers to counter attack with.  I have done this move enough that my opponents only take hits on AC after they have taken hits on aircraft.

    2. It is better to be the attacker than defender because you can retreat and also neutralize your opponents air power.  This has been mentioned with China attacking Japan, but also works well for Russia.  One way around that for Germany is to have Italy take the land then reinforce with Germany and their massive airforce.  Make it nearly impossible for Russia to counter that force with out risking its entire force.

    3. As Russia don’t lose your big starting force.  There is no point in keeping 20 inf in Leningrad if Germany can attack it and wipe out that force.  Instead give up Leningrad and either counterattack (depending on German force) or move that force closer to moscow to help defend the only spot in Russia that absolutely must be defended.



  • good points 1024
    I think fleet is better on the D though unless you have a pile of subs
    stay next to an island and you have extra cv’s worth of defense or is it defence? with scramblers
    also if you have a base you can repair your one hit carriers



  • @cond1024:

    Enjoying the thread, I have a few things to add:

    1. Don’t be so quick to take hits on your carriers, esp if you are on the defense.  If you don’t have a landing zone with in one move and you take hits on your carriers, the attacker can just retreat and you lose your airforce.  I have done this a couple of times on my unsuspecting Japanese opponents.  I have attacked with my large American navy against their large Japanese navy and after first round of combat Japan took damage on all of their carriers so I then just retreat and they lose all their airforce.  Now America is in a nice defensive position with all of it’s air and navy and japan only has surface ships and damaged aircraft carriers to counter attack with.  I have done this move enough that my opponents only take hits on AC after they have taken hits on aircraft.

    I have been in games where players take lots and lots of time deciding which casualties to take in the middle of a large naval battle (great fun).

    2. It is better to be the attacker than defender because you can retreat and also neutralize your opponents air power.  This has been mentioned with China attacking Japan, but also works well for Russia.  One way around that for Germany is to have Italy take the land then reinforce with Germany and their massive airforce.  Make it nearly impossible for Russia to counter that force with out risking its entire force.

    If you have 10 infantry against 20 tanks and 20 fighters, it really doesn’t matter if you’re attacking or defending. The can opener strategy can be applied in many areas of the game, I agree its very useful for Italy and Germany against Russia.

    3. As Russia don’t lose your big starting force.  There is no point in keeping 20 inf in Leningrad if Germany can attack it and wipe out that force.  Instead give up Leningrad and either counterattack (depending on German force) or move that force closer to moscow to help defend the only spot in Russia that absolutely must be defended.

    100% Agree. You can usually defend Moscow with 60+ infantry, 2 tanks, 2 mechs, 4 AA guns, 1 tac bomber, and 6 fighters against anything Germany can get there.



  • 1. As the Soviet Union, build up your industry on the first round (either Leningrad or Ukraine to a major IC). All Soviet IC’s aside from Moscow only produce 3 units. This is not enough to slow or halt Barbarossa. You want to stop the Germans at the front, not on the welcome mat to Moscow.

    2. As the Soviet Union, do not build all infantry or all tanks. Infantry have no attack counter attack capabilities alone against the German onslaught and your tanks will be too few to stop a German assault. Instead, buy infantry & artillery combos so that you can counter attack as well as defend. Build a few tanks to help out with counter attacks.

    3. As Germany it is essential that you keep Britain out of your hair so that you can focus most (if not all) your resources on the Soviet Union. If Germany does not capture Moscow before the Americans arrive then it is game over. Either capture London or drain UK’s economy with bombers and subs before your initiate Operation Barbarossa.

    4. As Italy your biggest role in the war is to oust the British from Africa and the Middle East. If you do not achieve at least two of your NO’s by the second round, you are not doing well. If Germany has to send forces to North Africa to help you get rid of the British, you are failing your part of the war. You might as well be as counter productive as the real Italians in the war.

    5. As Japan it is vital that you take control of the Dutch East Indies as soon as possible. This is where your economy will be boosted to a level that you can actually compete against the Americans. Do not be afraid of an American intervention. It may be in your favor to bring them in early if you can get Hong Kong, the Philippines and the Dutch East Indies within 1-2 rounds. Remember that you are the Primary opponent of the US. Keep pressure on them so that they do not kill Germany.


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