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Author Topic: What are you reading  (Read 7204 times)
KurtGodel7
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« Reply #15 on: February 27, 2016, 11:22:54 am »
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To anyone thinking of buying William Shirer's Rise and Fall of the Third Reich, I recommend the paper version over the eBook. If you own a wood burning stove, the paper version can be used to heat your home.

Shirer strongly opposed the American anti-communist movement, and had little patience with, or tolerance for, those who wished to reduce the (considerable) influence communists had on the American government and American media. Shirer denied that he himself was a communist.

Whether one believes the denial or not, Shirer's book contains as many lies, half truths, fabrications, misinterpretations, and selective omissions as one would expect from a communist. The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich is a work of fiction.

If you do choose to read this book, it will also be necessary to read a number of other books to correct the lies and distortions Shirer spreads.
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ABWorsham
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« Reply #16 on: March 02, 2016, 12:29:44 pm »
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I started reading The Russo- Germany War 1941-1945. I first read the book in 1999.
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« Reply #17 on: March 02, 2016, 04:29:33 pm »
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In order to get an accurate account of the war, I'm reading William Shirer's Rise and Fall of the Third Reich because of so many well written and researched passages...

No wonder why this book has stood the test of time and remains an excellent reference book. I think it won some awards for debunking that bogus account of Churchill and FDR being more evil than Hitler and making excuses for what Hitler did as if he was forced into Genocide by "Germany being starved" ( except for Hermann Goering-He still ate Fried Chicken).
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KurtGodel7
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« Reply #18 on: March 04, 2016, 09:06:46 am »
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Back when I was in high school, I devoted a considerable amount of time to reading Shirer's 1400 page time. More than once, I might add. The book was worth the time, I'd felt, because I was getting the real scoop on WWII. The New York Times book review said so!

But then I saw some assertion--I don't remember which one--debunked. I felt a little surprised, but did not question the veracity of the book as a whole. Then I learned of some key datum which Shirer had omitted from his book. Shirer can't use the space constraint excuse, because the book is 1400 pages long and contains plenty of content of relatively minor importance.

I also began wondering why Shirer had omitted any reference to the crimes against humanity committed by the Soviet Union before, during, and after the war. On the other hand, the New York Times (which had given him that favorable book review) had also denied the Ukrainian famine, while doing its best to get the U.S. to fight on the same side as the Soviet Union. Neither Shirer nor the New York Times gave a fig's leaf for absolute truth. That much is clear. They both had the same (very specific) political agenda. There is a reason why Shirer had been blacklisted as a communist in the 1950s, and that reason does not involve any honesty or good character on Shirer's part. If there are those here who want to be lied to, so that they can more effectively spread lies to others, Shirer's book will give them everything they want and more. I personally have grown tired of being lied to, manipulated, and used by America's narcissistic, immoral, self-centered ruling class. But if there are others here who enjoy that experience, who am I to judge?
« Last Edit: March 04, 2016, 09:10:03 am by KurtGodel7 » Logged
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« Reply #19 on: March 04, 2016, 09:29:00 am »
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Well not WWII books, but if you love history:

Just finished Conquerors by Roger Crowley. Excellent. The story of Portugal's fifteenth and sixteenth century forays into the Indian Ocean. A tiny country which deployed avaricious ferocity to carve out the first European global empire. I found it particularly interesting as I knew so little on this subject.

Now reading The War of Wars by Robert Harvey. A single volume (well - 900 pages) history of the British / French Revolutionary and Napoleonic War. Apparently proportionately more people died in this war than in either WWI or WWII.
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ABWorsham
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« Reply #20 on: June 23, 2016, 01:37:32 pm »
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Currently reading The First World War by Hew Strachan.
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« Reply #21 on: June 23, 2016, 03:04:11 pm »
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Reading a 1928 circular published by the Republican Party. It claims if Hoover was elected, he would provide a Chicken in every pot and even has a few recipes provided by Hoover on how to prepare it. Never realized what a smart man he was. Should have imparted his thoughts in History books.
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CWO Marc
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« Reply #22 on: June 27, 2016, 05:13:30 am »
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Currently reading The First World War by Hew Strachan.

If you enjoy the book (which I've never read), you might want to pick up the DVD of the documentary television series into which it was made. I've seen it and it's pretty good.
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ausf
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« Reply #23 on: August 01, 2016, 05:57:15 pm »
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I tend to get stuck on either a subject of interest or an author and read my way through a list until I'm sick of it.

I finished Clay Blair's two volumes on U-boats (The Hunters, The Hunted) which essentially covered every recorded sortie during the war, including personal information of both sides. Fascinating and exhausting.

That peaked my interest in British X-craft, so I grabbed a copy of Target Tirpitz, which peaked my interest on both the Bismarck, Nazairre Raid as well as manned torpedoes, so I have a few books either on hold at the library or on the way in the post while I finish Tirpitz.

I've been reading about WWII for about 20 years now and every book opens a whole new interest or bit of the war I haven't heard of before.

My wife wonders why I don't read fiction, but this stuff is wilder than anything any author could invent.
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RJL518
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« Reply #24 on: August 02, 2016, 05:27:01 pm »
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Hirohito's War: The Pacific War 1941-1945 by Francis Pike.

Then, moving back to the war in Europe with The Guns at Last Light by Rick Atkinson.
The final book in The Liberation Trilogy.
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HMS Serapis
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« Reply #25 on: December 08, 2016, 10:47:30 am »
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Eastern inferno - the journals of a german panzerjager on the Eastern front 1941-43. Edited by Alexander Christine and Mason Kunze.
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siredblood
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« Reply #26 on: December 08, 2016, 04:29:38 pm »
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The Eastern Front is a good one, ill look for the version/author is interested. Also, I love the Uniforms/Ranks of WWII.

Im not currently reading it, as I already have, but "A Bridge too far" is great, read it in Jr High, unfortunately for me that was 25+ years ago lool.
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barney
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« Reply #27 on: December 08, 2016, 04:37:12 pm »
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Looks like some good ones I hadn't heard of on here.

Just finished David Glantz's updated "When Titans Clashed". Never did read the '95 version although I saw it quoted a lot. Seems as if it has a little too much Russian love in it, but was still pretty interesting.

Read "The Taste of War:World War ll and the Battle for Food" a while back. Thought it was very good. I knew the Japanese had poor logistics but didn't realize they neglected it to the extent they did.
« Last Edit: December 08, 2016, 04:39:05 pm by barney » Logged
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« Reply #28 on: December 09, 2016, 09:07:15 am »
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Only 50 pages into The Secret War by Max Hastings, but it already looks really excellent. As always his willingness to draw big strategic conclusions from the evidence makes his books well worth reading.
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wittmann
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« Reply #29 on: December 10, 2016, 07:33:47 am »
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I have just started A Beevor's: Ardennes. Had it since last Christmas!
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